chord
I. noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English cord, short for accord Date: 1608 three or more musical tones sounded simultaneously II. verb Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. accord 2. to play chords especially on a stringed instrument transitive verb 1. to make chords on 2. harmonize III. noun Etymology: alteration of 1cord Date: 1543 1. cord 3a 2. a straight line segment joining and included between two points on a circle; broadly a straight line joining two points on a curve 3. an individual emotion or disposition <
struck a responsive chord
>
4. either of the two outside members of a truss connected and braced by the web members 5. the straight line distance joining the leading and trailing edges of an airfoil

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • chord — chord·ed; chord; clav·i·chord; clav·i·chord·ist; har·mon·i·chord; harp·si·chord; harp·si·chord·ist; hep·ta·chord; hex·a·chord; lyri·chord; mono·chord; neu·ro·chord; no·to·chord; no·va·chord; oc·ta·chord; pen·ta·chord; peri·chord; poly·chord;… …   English syllables

  • Chord — may refer to: Chord (music), an aggregate of musical pitches sounded simultaneously. Chord (guitar) an aggregate of musical pitches played simultaneously on a guitar Chord (geometry), a line segment joining two points on a curve Chord (astronomy) …   Wikipedia

  • Chord — ist ein strukturiertes Peer to Peer System, welches im Gegensatz zu den meisten unstrukturierten Systemen eine effiziente Suche nach Inhalten ermöglicht. Wie auch Gnutella ist Chord keine konkrete Implementierung, sondern ein Protokollsystem. Es… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Chord — (k[^o]rd), n. [L chorda a gut, a string made of a gut, Gr. chordh . In the sense of a string or small rope, in general, it is written cord. See {Cord}.] 1. The string of a musical instrument. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. (Mus.) A combination of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • chord — [ko:d US ko:rd] n [Sense: 1; Date: 1400 1500; Origin: accord] [Sense: 2 3; Date: 1500 1600; Origin: cord; influenced by Latin chorda ( CORD) (] [Sense: 2; Date: (17 19 centuries); Origin: chord string of a musical instrument )] …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • chord — Ⅰ. chord [1] ► NOUN ▪ a group of three or more notes sounded together in harmony. DERIVATIVES chordal adjective. ORIGIN from ACCORD(Cf. ↑accord); the spelling was influenced by CHORD(Cf. ↑chord …   English terms dictionary

  • chord — chord, cord 1. Although we are dealing here with three English words, their histories are very much intertwined, and their ultimate origin is in the Latin word chorda which has several meanings. To begin with, there are two distinct words spelt… …   Modern English usage

  • Chord — es un protocolo sencillo y escalable de búsqueda distribuida en redes P2P que relaciona claves (keys) con nodos. Está diseñado para funcionar en redes descentralizadas (es decir, sin nodos privilegiados), y su funcionamiento permite concluir con… …   Wikipedia Español

  • chord — [ kɔrd ] noun count * 1. ) two or more musical notes played together a ) a particular position of the fingers on the guitar, producing a particular sound 2. ) TECHNICAL a straight line that connects two points in a circle or curved line… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Chord — Chord, v. i. (Mus.) To accord; to harmonize together; as, this note chords with that. [1913 Webster] || …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Chord — Chord, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Chorded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Chording}.] To provide with musical chords or strings; to string; to tune. [1913 Webster] When Jubal struck the chorded shell. Dryden. [1913 Webster] Even the solitary old pine tree chords… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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