carouse
I. noun Etymology: Middle French carrousse, from carous, adverb, all out (in boire carous to empty the cup), from German gar aus Date: 1559 1. archaic a large draft of liquor ; toast 2. a drunken revel II. verb (caroused; carousing) Date: 1566 intransitive verb 1. to drink liquor freely or excessively 2. to take part in a carouse ; engage in dissolute behavior transitive verb obsolete to drink up ; quaffcarouser noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Carouse — Ca*rouse (k[.a]*rouz ), n. [F. carrousse, earlier carous, fr. G. garaus finishing stroke, the entire emptying of the cup in drinking a health; gar entirely + aus out. See {Yare}, and {Out}.] 1. A large draught of liquor. [Obs.] A full carouse of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Carouse — Ca*rouse v. t. To drink up; to drain; to drink freely or jovially. [Archaic] [1913 Webster] Guests carouse the sparkling tears of the rich grape. Denham. [1913 Webster] Egypt s wanton queen, Carousing gems, herself dissolved in love. Young. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • carouse — 1550s, from M.Fr. carousser drink, quaff, swill, from Ger. gar aus quite out, from gar austrinken to drink up entirely. Originally as an adv. (to drink carouse), later as a noun …   Etymology dictionary

  • carouse — ► VERB ▪ drink alcohol and enjoy oneself with others in a noisy, lively way. ► NOUN ▪ a noisy, lively drinking party. DERIVATIVES carousal noun carouser noun. ORIGIN originally meaning «right out, completely» in the phrase drink carouse, from… …   English terms dictionary

  • Carouse — Ca*rouse , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Caroused}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Carousing}.] To drink deeply or freely in compliment; to take part in a carousal; to engage in drunken revels. [1913 Webster] He had been aboard, carousing to his mates. Shak. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • carouse — verb be a drunkard, be convivial, be drunk, be immoderate, be intemperate, carry to excess, celebrate, comissari, commit a debauch, debauch, dissipate, drink, drink to excess, enervate oneself, exceed, feast, frolic, go on a spree, imbibe,… …   Law dictionary

  • carouse — [v] make merry, often with liquor booze, drink, frolic, go on a spree*, have fun, imbibe, paint the town*, paint the town red*, play, quaff, raise Cain*, revel, riot, roister, wassail, whoop it up*; concept 384 Ant. be sad, grieve …   New thesaurus

  • carouse — [kə rouz′] vi. caroused, carousing [obs. Fr carousse, carousal < Ger gar aus, quite out < gar austrinken, to drink up entirely] to drink much alcoholic liquor, esp. along with others having a noisy, merry time n. 1. a noisy, merry drinking… …   English World dictionary

  • carouse — [16] Etymologically, carouse means to drink something up ‘completely’. Originally it was an adverb, used in phrases such as drink carouse (‘the tiplinge sottes at midnight which to quaffe carouse do use’, Thomas Drant, Horace’s Epigrams 1567).… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • carouse — [16] Etymologically, carouse means to drink something up ‘completely’. Originally it was an adverb, used in phrases such as drink carouse (‘the tiplinge sottes at midnight which to quaffe carouse do use’, Thomas Drant, Horace’s Epigrams 1567).… …   Word origins

  • carouse — UK [kəˈraʊz] / US verb [intransitive] Word forms carouse : present tense I/you/we/they carouse he/she/it carouses present participle carousing past tense caroused past participle caroused mainly literary to drink alcohol and enjoy yourself in a… …   English dictionary

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