I. noun Etymology: Middle English bocher, from Anglo-French, from buc he-goat, probably of Celtic origin; akin to Middle Irish bocc he-goat — more at buck Date: 13th century 1. a. a person who slaughters animals or dresses their flesh b. a dealer in meat 2. one that kills ruthlessly or brutally 3. one that bungles or botches 4. a vendor especially on trains or in theaters II. transitive verb (butchered; butchering) Date: 1562 1. to slaughter and dress for market <
butcher hogs
2. to kill in a barbarous manner 3. botch <
butchered the play

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Butcher — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Adam Butcher (* 1988), kanadischer Schauspieler Eugene Butcher (* 1950), US amerikanischer Mediziner, Immunologe und Hochschullehrer Garth Butcher (* 1963), kanadischer Eishockeyspieler Goler Teal Butcher… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Butcher — Butch er (b[.u]ch [ e]r), n. [OE. bochere, bochier, OF. bochier, F. boucher, orig., slaughterer of buck goats, fr. OF. boc, F. bouc, a buck goat; of German or Celtic origin. See {Buck} the animal.] 1. One who slaughters animals, or dresses their… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • butcher — [n] meat killer, seller boner*, meatmarket person, meat person, processor, skinner*, slaughterer, slayer*; concept 348 butcher [v1] slay and prepare animal for meat beef up, carve, clean, cure, cut, cut down, dress, joint, liquidate, salt,… …   New thesaurus

  • butcher — ► NOUN 1) a person who cuts up and sells meat as a trade. 2) a person who slaughters animals for food. 3) a person who kills brutally or indiscriminately. ► VERB 1) slaughter or cut up (an animal) for food. 2) kill (someone) brutally. 3) …   English terms dictionary

  • Butcher — Butch er, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Butchered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Butchering}.] 1. To kill or slaughter (animals) for food, or for market; as, to butcher hogs. [1913 Webster] 2. To murder, or kill, especially in an unusually bloody or barbarous manner …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • butcher — c.1300, from Anglo Norm. boucher, from O.Fr. bochier butcher, executioner, probably lit. slaughterer of goats (12c., Mod.Fr. boucher), from bouc male goat, from Frank. *bukk (see BUCK (Cf. buck) (n.1)) or Celtic *bukkos he goat. Related …   Etymology dictionary

  • Butcher — (spr. Bötscher), Johanna (Joh. von Kent), Schwärmerin in England im 16. Jahrh., leugnete die Dreieinigkeit u. die Gottheit Christi u. behauptete, daß ein wiedergeborener Mensch zwar äußerlich, aber nicht innerlich sündigen könne; sie wurde 1549… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • butcher — index extinguish, mutilate, spoil (impair) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • butcher — [booch′ər] n. [ME bocher < OFr bochier, bouchier, one who kills and sells he goats < bouc, he goat < Frank * bukk, akin to OE bucca: see BUCK1] 1. a person whose work is killing animals or dressing their carcasses for meat 2. a person… …   English World dictionary

  • Butcher — Boning redirects here. For the use of this term in corsetry, see Bone (corsetry). For other uses, see Butcher (disambiguation). Butcher A butcher s, Tacuinum sanitatis casanatensis (XIV (14th) century) …   Wikipedia

  • butcher — In some regions of Australia butcher is a name for a measure of beer or the glass holding it. The first use of butcher recorded in The Australian National Dictionary is in the 1889 W.R. Thomas publication, Early Days: Over a good fat butcher of… …   Australian idioms

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