I. noun Etymology: Middle English borow Date: 13th century a hole or excavation in the ground made by an animal (as a rabbit) for shelter and habitation II. verb Date: 1602 transitive verb 1. archaic to hide in or as if in a burrow 2. a. to construct by tunneling b. to penetrate by means of a burrow 3. to make a motion suggestive of burrowing with ; nestle <
burrows her hand into mine
intransitive verb 1. to conceal oneself in or as if in a burrow 2. a. to make a burrow b. to progress by or as if by digging 3. to make a motion suggestive of burrowing ; snuggle, nestle <
burrowed against his back for warmth
burrower noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • burrow — [bʉr′ō] n. [ME burgh (see BOROUGH), infl. by bergh, hill, berwen, to defend, take refuge] 1. a hole or tunnel dug in the ground by an animal 2. any similar passage or hole for shelter, refuge, etc. vi. 1. to make a burrow; dig (in, into, under,… …   English World dictionary

  • Burrow — ist der Name folgender Personen: Jamie Burrow (* 1977), englischer Straßenradrennfahrer Trigant Burrow (1875–1950), US amerikanischer Psychoanalytikerin Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsklärung zur Unterscheidung mehrerer mit d …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Burrow — Bur row, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Burrowed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Burrowing}.] 1. To excavate a hole to lodge in, as in the earth; to lodge in a hole excavated in the earth, as conies or rabbits. [1913 Webster] 2. To lodge, or take refuge, in any deep or …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • burrow — [n] hole dug by animal couch, den, hovel, lair, retreat, shelter, tunnel; concept 517 burrow [v] dig a hole delve, excavate, hollow out, scoop out, tunnel, undermine; concept 178 Ant. cover, fill …   New thesaurus

  • burrow — ► NOUN ▪ a hole or tunnel dug by a small animal as a dwelling. ► VERB 1) make a burrow. 2) hide underneath or delve into something. DERIVATIVES burrower noun. ORIGIN variant of BOROUGH(Cf. ↑ …   English terms dictionary

  • Burrow — Bur row, n. [See 1st {Borough}.] 1. An incorporated town. See 1st {Borough}. [1913 Webster] 2. A shelter; esp. a hole in the ground made by certain animals, as rabbits, for shelter and habitation. [1913 Webster] 3. (Mining) A heap or heaps of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • burrow — index delve, hunt, research Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • burrow — rabbit hole, fox hole, etc., c.1300, borewe, from O.E. burgh stronghold, fortress (see BOROUGH (Cf. borough)); influenced by bergh hill, and berwen to defend, take refuge. The verb is first attested 1610s. Related: Burrowed; borrowing …   Etymology dictionary

  • Burrow — This interesting surname is of Anglo Saxon origin, and is either a topographical or locational name. As a topographical name Burrow derives from the Olde English pre 7th Century beorg , Old High German berg , a hill, mountain, or the Olde English …   Surnames reference

  • burrow — bur|row1 [ˈbʌrəu US ˈbə:rou] v 1.) [I always + adverb/preposition, T] to make a hole or passage in the ground = ↑dig down burrow into/under/through etc ▪ Mother turtles burrow into the sand to lay their eggs. 2.) [I,T always + adverb/preposition] …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • burrow — I UK [ˈbʌrəʊ] / US [ˈbʌroʊ] verb [intransitive] Word forms burrow : present tense I/you/we/they burrow he/she/it burrows present participle burrowing past tense burrowed past participle burrowed 1) a) to make a hole or tunnel in the ground burrow …   English dictionary

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