bunting
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century any of various stout-billed passerine birds (families Cardinalidae and Emberizidae) of which some are grouped with the cardinal and some with the New World sparrows — compare indigo bunting, painted bunting II. noun Etymology: perhaps from English dialect bunt (to sift) Date: 1711 1. a lightweight loosely woven fabric used chiefly for flags and festive decorations 2. a. flags b. decorations especially in the colors of the national flag III. noun Etymology: term of endearment in the nursery rhyme “Bye, baby bunting” Date: 1922 an infant's hooded outdoor garment made of napped fabric

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Bunting — can refer to:* Bunting (bird), a group of birds * An infant sleeping bag * The act of laying down a bunt, a type of offensive play in baseball * Bunting (textile), a lightweight cloth material often used for flags and festive decorations * Bye,… …   Wikipedia

  • Bunting — Bun ting, n. [Scot. buntlin, corn buntlin, OE. bunting, buntyle; of unknown origin.] (Zo[ o]l.) A bird of the genus {Emberiza}, or of an allied genus, related to the finches and sparrows (family {Fringillid[ae]}). [1913 Webster] Note: Among… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bünting — steht für: Bünting Gruppe, ein Handelsunternehmen in Leer/ Ostfriesland Bünting ist der Name folgender bekannter Personen: Heinrich Bünting (auch: Buntingus, Bunting, Pendingius, um 1545 1606), evangelischer Theologe und Chronist Karl Dieter… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • bunting — ‘bird’ [13] and bunting ‘flags’ [18] are presumably two distinct words, although in neither case do we really know where they come from. There was a now obsolete English adjective bunting, first recorded in the 16th century, which meant ‘plump,… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • bunting — ‘bird’ [13] and bunting ‘flags’ [18] are presumably two distinct words, although in neither case do we really know where they come from. There was a now obsolete English adjective bunting, first recorded in the 16th century, which meant ‘plump,… …   Word origins

  • Bunting — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Heath Bunting (* 1966), englischer Medienkünstler Hem Bunting (* 1985), kambodschanischer Mittel und Langstreckenläufer Mary Bunting (1910–1998), US amerikanische Mikrobiologin, Universitätspräsidentin …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bunting — Bun ting, Buntine Bun tine, n. [Prov. E. bunting sifting flour, OE. bonten to sift, hence prob. the material used for that purpose.] A thin woolen stuff, used chiefly for flags, colors, and ships signals. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bunting — Ⅰ. bunting [1] ► NOUN ▪ a seed eating songbird of a large group typically with brown streaked plumage and a boldly marked head. ORIGIN of unknown origin. Ⅱ. bunting [2] ► NOUN ▪ flags and streamers used as festive decorations …   English terms dictionary

  • bunting — bunting1 [bun′tiŋ] n. [< ? ME bonting, ger. of bonten, to sift: hence, cloth used for sifting] 1. a thin cloth used in making flags, streamers, etc. 2. flags, or strips of cloth in the colors of the flag, used as holiday decorations ☆ 3. a… …   English World dictionary

  • bunting — bunting1 /bun ting/, n. 1. a coarse, open fabric of worsted or cotton for flags, signals, etc. 2. patriotic and festive decorations made from such cloth, or from paper, usually in the form of draperies, wide streamers, etc., in the colors of the… …   Universalium

  • Bunting — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Patronyme Bunting est un nom de famille notamment porté par : Edward Bunting (1773 1843) est un musicien et collecteur irlandais de musique… …   Wikipédia en Français

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