bowl
I. noun Etymology: Middle English bolle, from Old English bolla; akin to Old High German bolla blister Date: before 12th century 1. a concave usually nearly hemispherical vessel; specifically a drinking vessel (as for wine) 2. the contents of a bowl 3. a bowl-shaped or concave part: as a. the hollow of a spoon or tobacco pipe b. the receptacle of a toilet 4. a. a natural formation or geographical region shaped like a bowl b. a bowl-shaped structure; especially an athletic stadium 5. a postseason football game between specially invited teams • bowled adjectivebowlful noun II. noun Etymology: Middle English boule, from Middle French, from Latin bulla bubble Date: 15th century 1. a. a ball (as of lignum vitae) weighted or shaped to give it a bias when rolled in lawn bowling b. plural but singular in construction lawn bowling 2. a delivery of the ball in bowling 3. a cylindrical roller or drum (as for a machine) III. verb Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. a. to participate in a game of bowling b. to roll a ball in bowling 2. to travel smoothly and rapidly (as in a wheeled vehicle) transitive verb 1. a. to roll (a ball) in bowling b. (1) to complete by bowling <
bowl a string
>
(2) to score by bowling <
bowls 150
>
2. to strike with a swiftly moving object

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bowl — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Se denomina Bowl o Tazón al partido final de algunas ligas de fútbol americano o a títulos disputados a partido único de este deporte. El origen del término viene de la forma de tazón o cuenco de los estadios, como… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Bowl — may refer to:* Bowl (drug culture), the receptacle in which marijuana is placed prior to smoking * Bowl, slang meaning to walk in the UK: Let s bowl * Bowl (vessel), a common open top vessel used to serve food * Bowls, a precision sport popular… …   Wikipedia

  • bowl — bowl1 [bōl] n. [ME bolle < OE bolla, cup, bowl < IE base * bhel , to swell, inflate (see BALL1); infl. in OE by L bulla, bubble, ball] 1. a deep, rounded container or dish, open at the top 2. the capacity or contents of a bowl 3. a thing or …   English World dictionary

  • Bowl — Bowl, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bowled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bowling}.] 1. To roll, as a bowl or cricket ball. [1913 Webster] Break all the spokes and fellies from her wheel, And bowl the round nave down the hill of heaven. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bowl — (b[=o]l), n. [OE. bolle, AS. bolla; akin to Icel. bolli, Dan. bolle, G. bolle, and perh. to E. boil a tumor. Cf. {Boll}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A concave vessel of various forms (often approximately hemispherical), to hold liquids, etc. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bowl — à Seattle Le bowl : à l origine, une …   Wikipédia en Français

  • bowl — Ⅰ. bowl [1] ► NOUN 1) a round, deep dish or basin. 2) a rounded, concave part of an object. 3) a natural basin. 4) chiefly N. Amer. a stadium for sporting or musical events. ORIGIN Old English, related to BOLL(Cf. ↑ …   English terms dictionary

  • Bowl — (b[=o]l), n. [F. boule, fr. L. bulla bubble, stud. Cf. {Bull} an edict, {Bill} a writing.] [1913 Webster] 1. A ball of wood or other material used for rolling on a level surface in play; a ball of hard wood having one side heavier than the other …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bowl — ‘round receptacle’ [OE] and bowl ‘ball used in bowls’ [15] come from different sources. The former (Old English bolle or bolla) comes ultimately from the Germanic base *bul , *bal , which was also the source of English ball, balloon, and ballot.… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • bowl — bowl; bowl·der·ing; bowl·dery; …   English syllables

  • bowl — ‘round receptacle’ [OE] and bowl ‘ball used in bowls’ [15] come from different sources. The former (Old English bolle or bolla) comes ultimately from the Germanic base *bul , *bal , which was also the source of English ball, balloon, and ballot.… …   Word origins

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