I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English assa, probably from Old Irish asan, from Latin asinus Date: before 12th century 1. any of several hardy gregarious African or Asian perissodactyl mammals (genus Equus) smaller than the horse and having long ears; especially an African mammal (E. asinus) that is the ancestor of the donkey 2. sometimes vulgar a stupid, obstinate, or perverse person <
made an ass of himself
— often compounded with a preceding adjective <
don't be a smart-ass
II. noun or arse Etymology: Middle English ars, ers, from Old English ærs, ears; akin to Old High German & Old Norse ars buttocks, Greek orrhos buttocks, oura tail Date: before 12th century 1. a. often vulgar buttocks — often used in emphatic reference to a specific person <
get your ass over here
saved my ass
b. often vulgar anus 2. usually vulgar sexual intercourse III. adverb Etymology: 2ass Date: circa 1920 often vulgar — used as a postpositive intensive especially with words of derogatory implication <

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • ASS — (Heb. חֲמוֹר, ḥamor), in the Talmud the feminine form ḥamorah occurs, or aton whose colt is called ayir. The ass belongs to the genus Equus to which belong the horse and the wild ass. Various strains exist in Ereẓ Israel. The most common is small …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • ass — S2 [æs] n [Sense: 1; Origin: Old English assa, from Latin asinus] [Sense: 2; Date: 1800 1900; Origin: Changed spelling of arse (11 21 centuries), from Old English Ars, ears] 1.) not polite a stupid, annoying person = ↑ …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • ASS — steht für: Ass (Spielkarte), eine Spielkarte Ass (Sport), einen nicht parierten Aufschlag bei einigen Ballsportarten wie Tennis, Volleyball oder Faustball das sogenannte Flieger Ass, einen erfolgreichen Jagdflugzeugpiloten Hole in one, das… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • ass — [ æs ] noun ▸ 1 part of body you sit on ▸ 2 stupid/annoying person ▸ 3 animal like a horse ▸ 4 for emphasizing orders ▸ 5 sexual activity ▸ + PHRASES 1. ) count IMPOLITE the part of your body that you sit on. British usually arse 2. ) count a… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Ass — steht für: Ass (Spielkarte), eine Spielkarte einen nicht parierten Aufschlag bei einigen Ballsportarten wie Tennis, Volleyball oder Faustball das sogenannte Fliegerass, einen „erfolgreichen“ Jagdflugzeugpiloten Hole in one, das Spielen einer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Ass — Ass, n. [OE. asse, AS. assa; akin to Icel. asni, W. asen, asyn, L. asinus, dim. aselus, Gr. ?; also to AS. esol, OHG. esil, G. esel, Goth. asilus, Dan. [ae]sel, Lith. asilas, Bohem. osel, Pol. osiel. The word is prob. of Semitic origin; cf. Heb.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ass — may refer to: *Ass (animal) or donkey ** Asinus *Buttocks, in colloquial usage * Ass (album), by Badfinger *ASS (car), a French car made from 1919 to 1920 *ASS (gene), a human gene that encodes for the enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase… …   Wikipedia

  • Ass. — Ass. 〈Abk. für〉 Assessor, Assistent * * * Ass. = Assessor; Assistent. * * * Ass.,   Abkürzung für Assessor, Assessorin. * * * Ass. = Assessor; Assistent …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Ass — Ass: Das Wort bezeichnete ursprünglich die »Eins« auf Würfeln, später auch auf Spielkarten. Weil das Ass in den meisten Kartenspielen die höchste ‹Trumpf›karte ist, nennt man heute (nach engl. Vorbild) im übertragenen Gebrauch z. B. auch einen… …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

  • ass — ass1 [as] n. [ME asse < OE assa, assen: prob. < OIr assan or Welsh asyn, both < L asinus] 1. any of a number of horselike perissodactylous mammals (family Equidae) having long ears and a short mane, esp. the common wild ass (Equus… …   English World dictionary

  • Ass — Ạss 〈n.; Gen.: es, Pl.: e〉 1. 〈urspr.〉 die Eins auf dem Würfel 2. Spielkarte mit dem höchsten Wert; Syn. Daus 3. 〈fig.〉 Spitzenkönner auf einem Gebiet, bes. im Sport; ein od. das Ass im Boxen, auf der Geige 4. 〈Sport; Tennis〉 ein für den Gegner… …   Lexikalische Deutsches Wörterbuch

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”