I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin angulus Date: 14th century 1. a corner whether constituting a projecting part or a partially enclosed space <
they sheltered in an angle of the building
2. a. the figure formed by two lines extending from the same point; also dihedral angle b. a measure of an angle or of the amount of turning necessary to bring one line or plane into coincidence with or parallel to another 3. a. the precise viewpoint from which something is observed or considered <
a camera angle
consider the question from all angles
; also the aspect seen from such an angle <
discuss all angles of the question
b. (1) a special approach, point of attack, or technique for accomplishing an objective <
try a new angle
(2) an often improper or illicit method of obtaining advantage <
a salesman always looking for an angle
4. a sharply divergent course <
the road went off at an angle
5. a position to the side of an opponent in football from which a player may block his opponent more effectively or without penalty — usually used in the phrases get an angle or have an angleangled adjective II. verb (angled; angling) Date: 1621 intransitive verb to turn or proceed at an angle transitive verb 1. to turn, move, or direct at an angle 2. to present (as a news story) from a particular or prejudiced point of view ; slant III. intransitive verb (angled; angling) Etymology: Middle English angelen, from angel fishhook, from Old English, from anga hook; akin to Old High German ango hook, Latin uncus, Greek onkos barbed hook, ankos glen Date: 15th century 1. to fish with a hook 2. to use artful means to attain an objective <
angled for an invitation

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

(of two lines), , , / , , , , , , (where two lines meet) / , , (with a rod),

Look at other dictionaries:

  • angle — [ ɑ̃gl ] n. m. • XIIe; lat. angulus 1 ♦ Cour. Saillant ou rentrant formé par deux lignes ou deux surfaces qui se coupent. ⇒ arête, coin, encoignure, renfoncement. À l angle de la rue. Former un angle, être en angle. La maison qui fait l angle,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Angle — An gle ([a^][ng] g l), n. [F. angle, L. angulus angle, corner; akin to uncus hook, Gr. agky los bent, crooked, angular, a gkos a bend or hollow, AS. angel hook, fish hook, G. angel, and F. anchor.] 1. The inclosed space near the point where two… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • angle — ANGLE. s. m. Inclination de deux lignes qui aboutissent a un mesme point. Angle droit. angle aigu. angle obtus. angle de tant de degrez. cette muraille fait un grand angle. angle saillant. angle rentrant. l angle du centre. l angle de la… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • angle — ANGLE. s. m. Ouverture de deux lignes qui se rencontrent. Angle droit. Angle aigu. Angle obtus. Angle de quarante cinq degrés. Angle de cent degrés. Angle saillant. Angle rentrant. Une figure à plusieurs angles. [b]f♛/b] On dit aussi, Les angles… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • angle — m. angle. Angle maigre : angle aigu. Géom. > Angle agut, obtùs, drech : angle aigu, obtus, droit. voir motut …   Diccionari Personau e Evolutiu

  • angle — angle1 [aŋ′gəl] n. [ME & OFr < L angulus, a corner, angle < Gr ankylos, bent, crooked: see ANKLE] 1. a) the shape made by two straight lines meeting at a common point, the vertex, or by two planes meeting along an edge: see DIHEDRAL,… …   English World dictionary

  • Angle — An gle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Angled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Angling}.] 1. To fish with an angle (fishhook), or with hook and line. [1913 Webster] 2. To use some bait or artifice; to intrigue; to scheme; as, to angle for praise. [1913 Webster] The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Angle — ist der Name folgender Personen: Edward H. Angle (1855–1930), US amerikanischer Orthodontist Kurt Angle (* 1968), US amerikanischer Wrestler Sharron Angle (* 1949), US amerikanische Politikerin Diese Seite ist eine …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Angle — member of a Teutonic tribe, Old English, from L. Angli the Angles, lit. people of Angul (O.N. Öngull), a region in what is now Holstein, said to be so called for its hook like shape (see ANGLE (Cf. angle) (n.)). People from the tribe there… …   Etymology dictionary

  • angle — noun. This word had been used since the 1870s in the meaning ‘the aspect from which a matter is considered’ • (The old stagers…the men who knew all the angles, who had great experience Nevil Shute, 1944) often with a defining word: the OED gives… …   Modern English usage

  • angle — [n1] shape formed by two lines meeting at a point bend, corner, crook, crotch, cusp, decline, divergence, dogleg, edge, elbow, flare, flection, flexure, fork, incline, intersection, knee, nook, notch, obliquity, point, slant, turn, turning, twist …   New thesaurus

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”