noun Etymology: probably from Dutch kabuis, kombuis, from Middle Low German kabūse Date: 1769 1. a ship's galley 2. a freight-train car attached usually to the rear mainly for the use of the train crew 3. one that follows or brings up the rear 4. buttocks

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

(of a ship),

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Caboose — der Burlington Northern im Jahr 1993 Als Dienst oder Güterzugbegleitwagen, Bremserwagen oder, auf Englisch, Caboose, Brake Van und Guard s Van werden spezielle Eisenbahnwagen bezeichnet, welche (einzeln) einem Güterzug oder Dienstzug in der Regel …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Caboose — Ca*boose (k[.a]*b[=oo]s ), n. [Cf. D. kabuis, kombuis, Dan. kabys, Sw. kabysa, G. kabuse a little room or hut. The First part of the word seems to be allied to W. cab cabin, booth. Cf. {Cabin}.] [Written also {camboose}.] 1. (Naut.) A house on… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • caboose — (n.) 1747, ship s cookhouse, from M.Du. kambuis ship s galley, from Low Ger. kabhuse wooden cabin on ship s deck; probably a compound whose elements correspond to English cabin and house. Railroading sense is by 1859 …   Etymology dictionary

  • caboose — ► NOUN 1) N. Amer. a wagon with accommodation for the crew on a freight train. 2) archaic a kitchen on a ship s deck. ORIGIN Dutch kabuis …   English terms dictionary

  • caboose — [kə bo͞os′] n. [MDu kabuys, kambuis (< ?), ship s galley] 1. Naut. Brit. a ship s kitchen; galley ☆ 2. the trainmen s car on a freight train, usually at the rear …   English World dictionary

  • Caboose — A caboose (North American railway terminology) or brake van or guard s van (British terminology) is a manned rail transport vehicle coupled at the end of a freight train. Although cabooses were once used on nearly every freight train in North… …   Wikipedia

  • caboose — UK [kəˈbuːs] / US [kəˈbus] noun [countable] Word forms caboose : singular caboose plural cabooses American the guard s van of a train …   English dictionary

  • caboose — [ka”bus] n. the buttocks. (From the name of the car at the end of a railroad train.) □ You just plunk your caboose over there on the settee and listen up to what I have to tell you. □ My caboose is bigger than I want it, but life is too short to… …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • caboose — Galley Gal ley, n.; pl. {Galleys}. [OE. gale, galeie (cf. OF. galie, gal[ e]e, LL. galea, LGr. ?; of unknown origin.] 1. (Naut.) A vessel propelled by oars, whether having masts and sails or not; as: (a) A large vessel for war and national… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • caboose — /keuh boohs /, n. 1. a car on a freight train, used chiefly as the crew s quarters and usually attached to the rear of the train. 2. Brit. a kitchen on the deck of a ship; galley. 3. Slang. the buttocks. [1740 50; < early modern D cabuse (D… …   Universalium

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