-y
I. adjective suffix also -ey Etymology: Middle English, from Old English -ig; akin to Old High German -īg -y, Latin -icus, Greek -ikos, Sanskrit -ika 1. a. characterized by ; full of <
blossomy
>
<
dirty
>
<
muddy
>
<
clayey
>
b. having the character of ; composed of <
icy
>
<
waxy
>
c. like ; like that of <
homey
>
<
wintry
>
— often with a disparaging connotation <
stagy
>
2. a. tending or inclined to <
sleepy
>
<
chatty
>
b. giving occasion for (specified) action <
teary
>
c. performing (specified) action <
curly
>
II. noun suffix (plural -ies) Etymology: Middle English -ie, from Anglo-French, from Latin -ia, from Greek -ia, -eia 1. state ; condition ; quality <
beggary
>
2. activity, place of business, or goods dealt with <
chandlery
>
<
laundry
>
3. whole body or group <
soldiery
>
III. noun suffix (plural -ies) Etymology: Middle English -ie, from Anglo-French, from Latin -ium instance of a (specified) action <
entreaty
>
<
inquiry
>
IV. — see -ie

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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