-s
I. noun plural suffix Etymology: Middle English -es, -s, from Old English -as, nominative & accusative plural ending of some masculine nouns; akin to Old Saxon -os — used to form the plural of most nouns that do not end in s, z, sh, ch, or postconsonantal y <
heads
>
<
books
>
<
boys
>
<
beliefs
>
, to form the plural of proper nouns that end in postconsonantal y <
Marys
>
, and with or without a preceding apostrophe to form the plural of abbreviations, numbers, letters, and symbols used as nouns <
MCs
>
<
PhD's
>
<
4s
>
<
the 1940's
>
<
$s
>
<
B's
>
— compare -es I II. adverb suffix Etymology: Middle English -es, -s, plural ending of nouns, from -es, genitive singular ending of nouns (functioning adverbially), from Old English -es — used to form adverbs denoting usual or repeated action or state <
always at home Sundays
>
<
mornings he stops by the newsstand
>
III. verb suffix Etymology: Middle English (Northern & North Midland dialect) -es, from Old English (Northumbrian dialect) -es, -as, probably from Old English -es, -as, 2d singular present indicative ending — more at -est — used to form the third person singular present of most verbs that do not end in s, z, sh, ch, or postconsonantal y <
falls
>
<
takes
>
<
plays
>
— compare -es II

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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