-ate
I. noun suffix Etymology: Middle English -at, from Anglo-French, from Latin -atus, -atum, masculine & neuter of -atus, past participle ending 1. one acted upon (in a specified way) <
distillate
>
2. [New Latin -atum, from Latin] chemical compound or complex anion derived from a (specified) compound or element <
phenolate
>
; especially salt or ester of an acid with a name ending in -ic and not beginning with hydro- <
borate
>
II. noun suffix Etymology: Middle English -at, from Anglo-French, from Latin -atus, from -a-, stem vowel of 1st conjunction + -tus, suffix of verbal nouns 1. office ; function ; rank ; group of persons holding a (specified) office or rank or having a (specified) function <
vicarate
>
2. state ; dominion ; jurisdiction <
emirate
>
<
khanate
>
III. adjective suffix Etymology: Middle English -at, from Latin -atus, from past participle ending of 1st conjunction verbs, from -a-, stem vowel of 1st conjunction + -tus, past participle suffix — more at -ed marked by having <
craniate
>
IV. verb suffix Etymology: Middle English -aten, from Latin -atus, past participle ending act on (in a specified way) <
insulate
>
; cause to be modified or affected by <
camphorate
>
; cause to become <
activate
>
; furnish with <
capacitate
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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