Soviet Central Asia

Soviet Central Asia
geographical name the portion of central Asia formerly belonging to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics & comprising the Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, & Uzbekistan republics & sometimes Kazakhstan

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Soviet Central Asia — refers to the section of Central Asia formerly controlled by the Soviet Union, as well as the time period of Soviet control (1918 1991). In terms of area, it is nearly synonymous with Russian Turkestan, the name for the region during the Russian… …   Wikipedia

  • Central Asia, history of — Introduction       history of the area from prehistoric and ancient times to the present.       In its historical application the term Central Asia designates an area that is considerably larger than the heartland of the Asian continent. Were it… …   Universalium

  • Central Asia — Area 4,003,400 km2 (1,545,721 sq mi)[1] Population 61,551,945 …   Wikipedia

  • Central Asia —       central region of Asia, extending from the Caspian Sea in the west to the border of western China in the east. It is bounded on the north by Russia and on the south by Iran, Afghanistan, and China. The region consists of the former Soviet… …   Universalium

  • Central Asia Monitor — was in publication from 1992 to 2002. The journal focused on historical and current events in the five former Soviet Republics of Central Asia: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Its founder and editor in chief was… …   Wikipedia

  • Central Asia, Russian role in —    The region of Central Asia is generally defined as the geopolitical space between Russia, Europe, China, and the Indian subcontinent. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the term generally refers to the five republics of Kazakhstan,… …   Historical Dictionary of the Russian Federation

  • Central Asia plus Japan — The Central Asia plus Japan dialogue is a political initiative between Japan and the Central Asian nations of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan, with the goal to create “a new framework for cooperation, thereby elevating… …   Wikipedia

  • Central Asia —    In the 1990s, the Asian countries absorbed into the Russian Empire and ruled by the Soviet Union became independent as all emerged as autonomous nations. Georgia and Armenia were predominantly Eastern Orthodox in faith, while the others were… …   Encyclopedia of Protestantism

  • Central Asia —    Indigenous shamanisms, Buddhism, and Islam meet in this vast landlocked region, and considerable interaction has resulted in many creative fusions and cultural evolutions. Traditionally, the Uzbeks and Tajiks were agriculturalists and… …   Historical dictionary of shamanism

  • Geostrategy in Central Asia — Central Asia has long been a geostrategic location merely because of its proximity to several great powers on the Eurasian landmass. The region itself never held a dominant stationary population, nor was able to make use of natural resources… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”