abide
verb (abode or abided; abiding) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ābīdan, from ā-, perfective prefix + bīdan to bide; akin to Old High German ir-, perfective prefix — more at bide Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to wait for ; await 2. a. to endure without yielding ; withstand b. to bear patiently ; tolerate <
cannot abide such bigots
>
3. to accept without objection <
will abide your decision
>
intransitive verb 1. to remain stable or fixed in a state 2. to continue in a place ; sojourn Synonyms: see bear, continueabider noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Abide — A*bide , v. t. 1. To wait for; to be prepared for; to await; to watch for; as, I abide my time. I will abide the coming of my lord. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] Note: [[Obs.], with a personal object. [1913 Webster] Bonds and afflictions abide me.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Abide — A*bide , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Abode}, formerly {Abid}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Abiding}.] [AS. [=a]b[=i]dan; pref. [=a] (cf. Goth. us , G. er , orig. meaning out) + b[=i]dan to bide. See {Bide}.] 1. To wait; to pause; to delay. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • abide — vt abode or abid·ed, abid·ing: to accept without objection abide by: to act or behave in accordance with or in obedience to Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • abide — is now limited to two main meanings, and has lost many others over seven centuries of use along with several redundant inflections, including abode. The principal meaning ‘to bear, tolerate’ is now only used in negative contexts, usually with a… …   Modern English usage

  • abide — [v1] submit to, put up with accept, acknowledge, bear, bear with*, be big about*, concede, consent, defer, endure, hang in*, hang in there*, hang tough*, live with*, put up with*, receive, sit tight*, stand, stand for, stomach, suffer, swallow,… …   New thesaurus

  • abide — ► VERB 1) (abide by) accept or observe (a rule or decision). 2) informal tolerate: he could not abide conflict. 3) (of a feeling or memory) endure. 4) archaic live; dwell. ORIGIN Old English, wait ; related to BIDE(Cf. ↑ …   English terms dictionary

  • abide — (v.) O.E. abidan, gebidan remain, wait, delay, remain behind, from ge completive prefix (denoting onward motion; see A (Cf. a ) (1)) + bidan bide, remain, wait, dwell (see BIDE (Cf. bide)). Originally intransitive (with genitive of the object: we …   Etymology dictionary

  • abide — [ə bīd′] vi. abode [ə bōd′] or abided, abiding [ME abiden < OE ābīdan < ā , intens. + bīdan, BIDE] 1. to stand fast; remain; go on being 2. Archaic to stay; reside ( in or at) vt. 1. to await …   English World dictionary

  • abide — 1 *stay, wait, remain, tarry, linger Analogous words: dwell, *reside, live, sojourn, lodge: *stick, cleave, cling, adhere Antonyms: depart Contrasted words: *go, leave, quit: *move, remove, shift …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • abide — [c]/əˈbaɪd / (say uh buyd) verb (abided or, Archaic, abode /əˈboʊd / (say uh bohd), abiding) –verb (t) 1. to put up with; tolerate: *There were a thousand trainees in the intake but I was among the select handful of those whose aspect he couldn t …   Australian English dictionary

  • abide — abider, n. /euh buyd /, v., abode or abided, abiding. v.i. 1. to remain; continue; stay: Abide with me. 2. to have one s abode; dwell; reside: to abide in a small Scottish village. 3. to continue in a particular condition, attitude, relationship …   Universalium

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