broadcloth
noun Date: 15th century 1. a twilled napped woolen or worsted fabric with smooth lustrous face and dense texture 2. a fabric usually of cotton, silk, or rayon made in plain and rib weaves with soft semigloss finish

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Broadcloth — Broad cloth, n. A fine smooth faced woolen cloth for men s garments, usually of double width (i.e., a yard and a half); so called in distinction from woolens three quarters of a yard wide. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • broadcloth — ► NOUN ▪ a fine cloth of wool or cotton …   English terms dictionary

  • broadcloth — [brôd′klôth΄] n. 1. a fine, smooth woolen cloth: so called because it originally was made on wide looms 2. a fine, smooth cotton, rayon, or silk cloth, used for shirts, pajamas, etc …   English World dictionary

  • Broadcloth — King Gustav II Adolf s dress of dark purple broadcloth and gold …   Wikipedia

  • broadcloth — /brawd klawth , kloth /, n. Textiles. 1. a closely woven dress goods fabric of cotton, rayon, silk, or a mixture of these fibers, having a soft, mercerized finish and resembling poplin. 2. a woolen or worsted fabric constructed in a plain or… …   Universalium

  • broadcloth — noun A fine smooth faced woolen cloth for men’s garments, usually of double width (i.e., a yard and a half); so called in distinction from woolens three quarters of a yard wide …   Wiktionary

  • broadcloth — dense twilled wool or worsted fabric Fabric and Cloth …   Phrontistery dictionary

  • broadcloth — n. high quality woolen or silk cloth …   English contemporary dictionary

  • broadcloth — noun clothing fabric of fine twilled wool or worsted, or plain woven cotton …   English new terms dictionary

  • broadcloth — broad•cloth [[t]ˈbrɔdˌklɔθ, ˌklɒθ[/t]] n. pl. cloths [[t] ˌklɔðz, ˌklɒðz, ˌklɔθs, ˌklɒθs[/t]] 1) tex a closely woven fabric of cotton, rayon, silk, or a mixture of these, having a soft mercerized finish, used for shirts, dresses, etc 2) tex a… …   From formal English to slang

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