wodge
noun Etymology: probably alteration of wedge Date: 1860 chiefly British a bulky mass or chunk ; lump, wad

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • wodge — [wɔdʒ US wa:dʒ] n BrE informal a thick solid piece or large amount of something wodge of ▪ a wodge of ten pound notes …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • wodge — ► NOUN Brit. informal ▪ a large piece or amount. ORIGIN alteration of WEDGE(Cf. ↑wedge) …   English terms dictionary

  • wodge — [wäj] n. [Brit. Informal] a chunk or lump of something …   English World dictionary

  • wodge — UK [wɒdʒ] / US [wɑdʒ] noun [countable] Word forms wodge : singular wodge plural wodges British informal a large piece or amount of something a wodge of cake He pulled out a wodge of twenty pound notes …   English dictionary

  • wodge — [[t]wɒ̱ʤ[/t]] wodges also wadge N COUNT: usu N of n A wodge of something is a large amount of it or a large piece of it. [BRIT, INFORMAL] ...a wodge of syrupy sponge …   English dictionary

  • wodge — noun A bulk quantity; usually of small items, particularly money. He left a large wodge of money behind the sofa …   Wiktionary

  • wodge — noun (C) BrE informal a thick, solid piece or large amount of something: a wodge of ten pound notes …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • wodge — wodgy, adj. /woj/, n. Brit. Informal. 1. a lump, chunk, or wad. 2. an object having a lumpy, bulgy shape. [1905 10; perh. alter. of WEDGE] * * * …   Universalium

  • Wodge — large lump, pile, mass, etc …   Dictionary of Australian slang

  • wodge — Australian Slang large lump, pile, mass, etc …   English dialects glossary

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