windflower
noun Date: 1551 anemone 1

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Windflower — may refer to: * the common name of Anemone nemorosa , a poisonous plant. * Sir Edward Elgar s private name for Alice Stuart Wortley, his close friend and correspondent. * Windflowers , a song written by Dan Seals. * Windflowers , a painting of… …   Wikipedia

  • Windflower — Wind flow er, n. (Bot.) The anemone; so called because formerly supposed to open only when the wind was blowing. See {Anemone}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • windflower — [wind′flou΄ər] n. ANEMONE (sense 1) …   English World dictionary

  • windflower — Wood Wood, n. [OE. wode, wude, AS. wudu, wiodu; akin to OHG. witu, Icel. vi?r, Dan. & Sw. ved wood, and probably to Ir. & Gael. fiodh, W. gwydd trees, shrubs.] [1913 Webster] 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest or grove; frequently …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • windflower — /wind flow euhr/, n. any plant belonging to the genus Anemone, of the buttercup family, having divided leaves and showy, solitary flowers. [1545 55; trans. of Gk amemóne ANEMONE; see WIND1, FLOWER] * * * …   Universalium

  • windflower — noun An early spring flowering species of the family Ranunculaceae; Anemone nemorosa. Syn: wood anemone, European thimbleweed, smell fox …   Wiktionary

  • windflower — n. anemone, cup shaped flower in various colors (white, pink, red, or purple) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • windflower — noun an anemone …   English new terms dictionary

  • windflower — wind•flow•er [[t]ˈwɪndˌflaʊ ər[/t]] n. pln any plant belonging to the genus Anemone, of the buttercup family, having divided leaves and showy, solitary flowers • Etymology: 1545–55; trans. of Gk anemṓnē anemone …   From formal English to slang

  • windflower — /ˈwɪndflaʊə/ (say windflowuh) noun any plant of the genus Anemone. {translation of Greek anemōnē anemone} …   Australian English dictionary

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