blub
intransitive verb (blubbed; blubbing) Date: 1559 chiefly British blubber

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • blub — blub; blub·ber·er; blub·ber·ing·ly; blub·ber; blub·bery; …   English syllables

  • Blub — Blub, v. t. & i. [Cf. {Bleb}, {Blob}.] To swell; to puff out, as with weeping. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • blub — /blub/, n. a swelling of fresh plasterwork. [1550 60; var. of BLOB] * * * …   Universalium

  • blub — (v.) fit of weeping, 1894, imitative. As a verb by 1843. Related: Blubbed; blubbing …   Etymology dictionary

  • blub — ► VERB (blubbed, blubbing) informal ▪ sob noisily. ORIGIN abbreviation of BLUBBER(Cf. ↑blubbery) …   English terms dictionary

  • blub — UK [blʌb] / US verb [intransitive] Word forms blub : present tense I/you/we/they blub he/she/it blubs present participle blubbing past tense blubbed past participle blubbed same as blubber I, 1) …   English dictionary

  • blub — [[t]blʌ̱b[/t]] blubs, blubbing, blubbed VERB If someone blubs, they cry because they are unhappy or frightened. [BRIT, INFORMAL] All of a sudden I felt very weak and wanted to blub. Syn: cry, blubber …   English dictionary

  • blub — /blʌb/ (say blub) verb (i) (blubbed, blubbing) Colloquial to weep; cry noisily. {shortened form of blubber} …   Australian English dictionary

  • blub — verb To cry, whine or blubber …   Wiktionary

  • blub — vb British to cry, weep. A middle class children s and public school term, typically used derisively. It is a shortening of the collo quial blubber . ► But the boiled egg made his gorge rise, and it was as much as he could do to stop himself… …   Contemporary slang

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