Verner's law
noun Etymology: Karl A. Verner Date: 1878 a statement in historical linguistics: in medial or final position in voiced environments and when the immediately preceding vowel did not bear the principal accent in Proto-Indo-European, the Proto-Germanic voiceless fricatives f, Þ, and χ derived from the Proto-Indo-European voiceless stops p, t, and k and the Proto-Germanic voiceless fricative s derived from Proto-Indo-European s became the voiced fricatives ƀ, ð, ǥ, and z represented in various recorded Germanic languages by b, d, g, and r

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Verner's law — Verner s law, stated by Karl Verner in 1875, describes a historical sound change in the Proto Germanic language whereby voiceless fricatives * f , * þ , * s and * x , when immediately following an unstressed syllable in the same word, underwent… …   Wikipedia

  • Verner's law — Ver ner s law (Philol.) A statement, propounded by the Danish philologist Karl Verner in 1875, which explains certain apparent exceptions to Grimm s law by the original position of the accent. Primitive Indo European k, t, p, became first in… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Verner's law — [vʉr′nərz, ver′nərz] n. [formulated (1875) by Karl Verner (1846 96), Dan philologist] an explanation for a series of apparent exceptions to Grimm s law, stating that the Proto Germanic word medial voiceless spirants (f, th, h, s), derived from… …   English World dictionary

  • Verner's law — noun a qualification of Grimm s law • Hypernyms: ↑sound law * * * Verner s law see law n.1 17 c …   Useful english dictionary

  • Verner's law — Ling. the statement by K. Verner of a regularity behind some apparent exceptions in the Germanic languages to Grimm s law, namely, that Proto Germanic voiceless fricatives became voiced when between voiced sounds if the immediately preceding… …   Universalium

  • Verner's law — Ver′ner s law′ n. ling. a statement of the regularity behind some apparent exceptions in the Germanic languages to Grimm s law, namely, that Proto Germanic voiceless fricatives became voiced when occurring between voiced sounds if the immediately …   From formal English to slang

  • Verner's law — /ˈvɜnəz lɔ/ (say vernuhz law) noun an account explaining apparent exceptions to Grimm s law by showing their dependence on the position of word stress in primitive Indo European; explains, for example, the apparent irregular development of Indo… …   Australian English dictionary

  • Kluge's Law — is a Proto Germanic sound law formulated by Friedrich Kluge. It describes the assimilation of an n to a preceding voiced consonant, under the condition that the n was part of a suffix which was accented in Proto Indo European (PIE). This law… …   Wikipedia

  • Grimm's law — (also known as the First Germanic Sound Shift or the Rask s Grimm s rule) named for Jacob Grimm, is a set of statements describing the inherited Proto Indo European (PIE) stops as they developed in Proto Germanic (PGmc, the common ancestor of the …   Wikipedia

  • Holtzmann's Law — is a Proto Germanic sound law originally noticed by Adolf Holtzmann in 1838.The law affects the doubling or Verschärfung of PIE PIE|* y and PIE|* w to Proto Germanic ge. * jj and ge. * ww , which further hardened to ge. ggj / ge. ggv in Northern… …   Wikipedia

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