blow one's cover
phrasal to reveal one's real identity

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • blow one's cover — idi blow one s cover, to divulge one s secret identity, esp. inadvertently …   From formal English to slang

  • blow one's cover — phrasal : to reveal one s real identity : give one s cover away …   Useful english dictionary

  • blow one's cover — expose one s false identity …   English contemporary dictionary

  • blow someone's cover — (informal) To reveal someone s identity • • • Main Entry: ↑blow * * * blow someone’s cover phrase to tell people who someone really is or what they are really doing, especially when doing this puts that person in danger or spoils a plan One… …   Useful english dictionary

  • blow someone's cover — to tell people who someone really is or what they are really doing, especially when doing this puts that person in danger or spoils a plan One mistake could blow our agent s cover and ruin years of careful investigation …   English dictionary

  • blow one’s lines — tv. to forget one’s lines in a play; to speak one’s lines incorrectly in a play. □ There I was in my first major role, and I blow my lines! □ If you blow your lines, just try to cover it up …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • blow one's mind — vb to be transported beyond a normal state of mental equilibrium, experience sud den euphoria or disorientation. A key term from the lexicon of drug users of the 1960s, this phrase was rapidly gen eralised to cover less momentous instances of… …   Contemporary slang

  • To blow one's own trumpet — Blow Blow, v. t. 1. To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means; as, to blow the fire. [1913 Webster] 2. To drive by a current air; to impel; as, the tempest blew the ship ashore. [1913 Webster] Off at sea northeast winds… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • blow — blow1 /bloh/, n. 1. a sudden, hard stroke with a hand, fist, or weapon: a blow to the head. 2. a sudden shock, calamity, reversal, etc.: His wife s death was a terrible blow to him. 3. a sudden attack or drastic action: The invaders struck a blow …   Universalium

  • blow — I [[t]bloʊ[/t]] n. 1) a sudden, hard stroke with a hand, fist, or weapon 2) a sudden shock, calamity, reversal, etc 3) a sudden attack or drastic action • come to blows Etymology: 1425–75; late ME blaw, N form repr. later blowe II blow… …   From formal English to slang

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