unpeopled
adjective Date: circa 1586 not filled with or occupied by people <
an unpeopled wilderness
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • unpeopled — index devoid Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • unpeopled — /un pee peuhld/, adj. without people; uninhabited. [1580 90; UN 1 + PEOPLED] * * * …   Universalium

  • unpeopled — adjective Not inhabited by people. Syn: peopleless, uninhabited, unpopulated …   Wiktionary

  • unpeopled — Synonyms and related words: abandoned, available, deserted, forsaken, free, godforsaken, open, tenantless, unfilled, uninhabited, unmanned, unoccupied, unpopulated, unstaffed, untaken, untenanted, untended, vacant …   Moby Thesaurus

  • unpeopled — adjective empty of people …   English new terms dictionary

  • unpeopled — un·peopled …   English syllables

  • unpeopled — adjective with no people living there vast unpopulated plains • Syn: ↑unpopulated • Similar to: ↑uninhabited …   Useful english dictionary

  • Hiroh Kikai — nihongo|Hiroh Kikai|鬼海 弘雄|Kikai Hiroo|extra=born 18 March 1945 is a Japanese photographer best known for his monochrome portraits of people in the Asakusa area of Tokyo, a project he has pursued for over thirty years.Early yearsKikai was born in… …   Wikipedia

  • Beyond comparison — Comparison Com*par i*son (? or ?), n. [F. comparaison, L. comparatio. See 1st {Compare}.] 1. The act of comparing; an examination of two or more objects with the view of discovering the resemblances or differences; relative estimate. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Comparison — Com*par i*son (? or ?), n. [F. comparaison, L. comparatio. See 1st {Compare}.] 1. The act of comparing; an examination of two or more objects with the view of discovering the resemblances or differences; relative estimate. [1913 Webster] As sharp …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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