unakite
noun Etymology: Unaka Mountains, Tennessee & North Carolina + 1-ite Date: 1874 an altered igneous rock that is usually opaque with green, black, pink, and white flecks and is usually used as a gemstone

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Unakite — Un ours en unakite L unakite est une roche de la famille des granites altérés, composée d orthose (rose), d épidote (verte) et de quartz (généralement incolore). Elle existe en de nombreuses nuances de vert et de rose, avec des cristaux d… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Unakite — First discovered in the United States in the Unakas mountains of North Carolina, unakite is an altered granite composed of pink orthoclase feldspar, green epidote, and generally clear quartz. It exists in various shades of green and pink and is… …   Wikipedia

  • unakite — unak·ite …   English syllables

  • unakite — ˈyünəˌkīt noun ( s) Etymology: Unaka mountains, Tenn. & N.C. + English ite (I) : an altered igneous rock that is usually opaque with green, black, pink, and white flecks and is usually used as a gemstone …   Useful english dictionary

  • Jaspe — Catégorie IX : silicates[1] Jaspe poli Général …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Greenville, South Carolina —   City   …   Wikipedia

  • List of minerals — This is a List of minerals for which there are Wikipedia articles. Mineral variety names and mineraloids are to be listed after the valid minerals for each letter.For a complete listing (about 4,000) of all mineral names: List of minerals… …   Wikipedia

  • List of rock types — This page is intended as a list of all rock types. NOTOC A : Amphibolite: Andesite: Anorthosite : Anthracite: Aplite: Argillite: Arkose B : Banded iron formation: Basalt: Basanite: Blueschist: Boninite: Breccia C : Carbonatite: Cataclasite: Chalk …   Wikipedia

  • Héliotrope (minéral) — Héliotrope Catégorie IX : silicates[1] Pierres de sang polies …   Wikipédia en Français

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