transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin toleratus, past participle of tolerare to endure, put up with; akin to Old English tholian to bear, Latin tollere to lift up, latus carried (suppletive past participle of ferre), Greek tlēnai to bear Date: 1524 1. to endure or resist the action of (as a drug or food) without serious side effects or discomfort ; exhibit physiological tolerance for 2. a. to allow to be or to be done without prohibition, hindrance, or contradiction b. to put up with <
learn to tolerate one another
Synonyms: see beartolerative adjectivetolerator noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Tolerate — Tol er*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tolerated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Tolerating}.] [L. toleratus, p. p. of tolerare, fr. the same root as tollere to lift up, tuli, used as perfect of ferre to bear, latus (for tlatus), used as p. p. of ferre to bear, and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tolerate — [täl′ər āt΄] vt. tolerated, tolerating [< L toleratus, pp. of tolerare, to bear, sustain, tolerate < IE base * tel , to lift up, bear > THOLE2, TALENT, L tollere, to lift up] 1. to not interfere with; allow; permit [to tolerate heresy] 2 …   English World dictionary

  • tolerate — I verb abide, accept, acquiesce, allow, be lenient, bear, bear with, brook, carry on, consent, endure, forbear, indulge, make the best of, oblige, permit, put up with, receive, sanction, stand, stomach, submit to, suffer, swallow, take patiently …   Law dictionary

  • tolerate — (v.) 1530s, from L. toleratus, pp. of tolerare (see TOLERATION (Cf. toleration)). Related: Tolerated; tolerating …   Etymology dictionary

  • tolerate — endure, abide, *bear, suffer, stand, brook Analogous words: accept, *receive: submit, *yield, bow, succumb …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • tolerate — [v] allow, indulge abide, accept, admit, authorize, bear, bear with, blink at*, brook, condone, consent to, countenance, endure, go, go along with, have, hear, humor, live with, permit, pocket, put up with, receive, sanction, sit and take it*,… …   New thesaurus

  • tolerate — ► VERB 1) allow (something that one dislikes or disagrees with) to exist or occur without interference. 2) patiently endure (something unpleasant). 3) be capable of continued exposure to (a drug, toxin, etc.) without adverse reaction. DERIVATIVES …   English terms dictionary

  • tolerate — verb 1 allow sth you do not like ADVERB ▪ barely ▪ just, merely ▪ She actually seemed pleased to see him: most of her visitors she merely tolerated. ▪ grudgingly ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • tolerate — 01. It is difficult to [tolerate] a person who continually lies. 02. I find it really difficult to [tolerate] obnoxious people. 03. Living conditions while working tree planting weren t great, but they were certainly [tolerable]. 04. If you take… …   Grammatical examples in English

  • tolerate — tol|e|rate [ˈtɔləreıt US ˈta: ] v [T] [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of tolerare] 1.) to allow people to do, say, or believe something without criticizing or punishing them →↑tolerant, tolerance ↑tolerance ▪ We simply will… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • tolerate */ — UK [ˈtɒləreɪt] / US [ˈtɑləˌreɪt] verb [transitive] Word forms tolerate : present tense I/you/we/they tolerate he/she/it tolerates present participle tolerating past tense tolerated past participle tolerated 1) to allow someone to do something… …   English dictionary

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