take on
verb Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to begin to perform or deal with ; undertake <
took on new responsibilities
>
b. to contend with as an opponent <
took on the neighborhood bully
>
2. engage, hire 3. a. to assume or acquire as or as if one's own <
the city's plaza takes on a carnival air — W. T. LeViness
>
b. to have as a mathematical domain or range <
what values does the function take on
>
intransitive verb to show one's feelings especially of grief or anger in a demonstrative way <
she cried, and took on like a distracted body — Daniel Defoe
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • take on — index adopt, attempt, contend (dispute), embark, endeavor, engage (involve), fight ( …   Law dictionary

  • take on — 1) PHRASAL VERB If you take on a job or responsibility, especially a difficult one, you accept it. [V P n (not pron)] No other organisation was able or willing to take on the job... [V P n (not pron)] Don t take on more responsibilities than you… …   English dictionary

  • take on — {v.} 1. To receive for carrying; be loaded with. * /A big ship was at the dock taking on automobiles in crates to carry overseas for sale./ * /The bus driver stopped at the curb to take the woman on./ 2. To begin to have (the look of); take (the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take on — {v.} 1. To receive for carrying; be loaded with. * /A big ship was at the dock taking on automobiles in crates to carry overseas for sale./ * /The bus driver stopped at the curb to take the woman on./ 2. To begin to have (the look of); take (the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take\ on — v 1. To receive for carrying; be loaded with. A big ship was at the dock taking on automobiles in crates to carry overseas for sale. The bus driver stopped at the curb to take the woman on. 2. To begin to have (the look of); take (the appearance… …   Словарь американских идиом

  • take on — I. fight, challenge    Mac wanted to take on Ted, but Ted didn t want to fight. II. agree to do, accept a responsibility    I m very busy. I can t take on any more work right now. III. employ, hire, hire on    AmCorp is taking on workers. Should… …   English idioms

  • take on — 1) begin to handle, commit oneself to Recently he has begun to take on too many things at work and has become very tired. 2) give a job to, hire, employ The factory took on over fifty new employees last month. 3) begin to have the look of He has… …   Idioms and examples

  • take on — phr verb Take on is used with these nouns as the object: ↑appearance, ↑aspect, ↑assignment, ↑aura, ↑burden, ↑cargo, ↑challenge, ↑challenger, ↑character, ↑client, ↑commitment, ↑ …   Collocations dictionary

  • take on — Synonyms and related words: accept, ache, acquire, add, admit, adopt, agonize, air a grievance, annex, antagonize, append, appropriate, assume, attack, attempt, battle, be livid, be pissed, beat against, beat up against, beef, bellyache, bespeak …   Moby Thesaurus

  • take on — I (Roget s IV) v. 1. [To hire] Syn. employ, engage, give work to; see hire 1 . 2. [To acquire an appearance] Syn. emerge, develop, turn; see become 1 , seem . 3. [To undertake] Syn. attempt, handle, endeavor; see try 1 , undertake . 4. [*To meet… …   English dictionary for students

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