take on
verb Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to begin to perform or deal with ; undertake <
took on new responsibilities
>
b. to contend with as an opponent <
took on the neighborhood bully
>
2. engage, hire 3. a. to assume or acquire as or as if one's own <
the city's plaza takes on a carnival air — W. T. LeViness
>
b. to have as a mathematical domain or range <
what values does the function take on
>
intransitive verb to show one's feelings especially of grief or anger in a demonstrative way <
she cried, and took on like a distracted body — Daniel Defoe
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • take on — {v.} 1. To receive for carrying; be loaded with. * /A big ship was at the dock taking on automobiles in crates to carry overseas for sale./ * /The bus driver stopped at the curb to take the woman on./ 2. To begin to have (the look of); take (the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take on — {v.} 1. To receive for carrying; be loaded with. * /A big ship was at the dock taking on automobiles in crates to carry overseas for sale./ * /The bus driver stopped at the curb to take the woman on./ 2. To begin to have (the look of); take (the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Take On You — is a board game publisher. Take On You creates and publishes French language games. Fantasy Flight Games is their partner for the English language versions of their games.Games* Tannhäuser – A skirmish game based in a reality where the Great War… …   Wikipedia

  • Take on Me — Infobox Single Name = Take on Me Artist = a ha from Album = Hunting High and Low Released = 19 October 1984 B side = Love Is Reason Format = 7 single, 12 single Recorded = 1984 Genre = Synthpop New Wave Length = 3:46 Label = Warner Bros. Records… …   Wikipedia

  • take on faith — {v. phr.} To lend credence to something due to one s confidence in the source, rather than based on evidence. * /One should never take on faith what one hears about Washington politics./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take on faith — {v. phr.} To lend credence to something due to one s confidence in the source, rather than based on evidence. * /One should never take on faith what one hears about Washington politics./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take on oneself — or[take upon oneself] {v. phr.} 1. To accept as a duty or responsibility. * /He took it on himself to see that the packages were delivered./ 2. To assume wrongfully or without permission as a right or privilege. * /You should not have taken it… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take on the chin — {v. phr.} To gracefully accept criticism. * /It s good to be able to tell people what they do wrong, but it is equally important to be able to take it on the chin when they tell you what you have done wrong./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take on oneself — or[take upon oneself] {v. phr.} 1. To accept as a duty or responsibility. * /He took it on himself to see that the packages were delivered./ 2. To assume wrongfully or without permission as a right or privilege. * /You should not have taken it… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take on the chin — {v. phr.} To gracefully accept criticism. * /It s good to be able to tell people what they do wrong, but it is equally important to be able to take it on the chin when they tell you what you have done wrong./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

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