takeoff
noun Date: 1846 1. an imitation especially in the way of caricature 2. a. a spot at which one takes off b. a starting point ; point of departure 3. a. a rise or leap from a surface in making a jump or flight or an ascent in an aircraft or in the launching of a rocket b. an action of starting out c. a rapid rise in activity, growth, or popularity <
an economic takeoff
>
4. an action of removing something 5. a mechanism for transmission of the power of an engine or vehicle to operate some other mechanism

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Takeoff — is the phase of flight in which an aircraft goes through a transition from moving along the ground (taxiing) to flying in the air, usually starting on a runway. For balloons, helicopters and some specialized fixed wing aircraft (VTOL aircraft… …   Wikipedia

  • Takeoff — Take off , Take off Take off , n. 1. An imitation, especially in the way of caricature; used with of or on; as, the comedian did a hilarious takeoff on the president. [1913 Webster +PJC] 2. The spot at which one takes off; specif., the place from …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • takeoff — take‧off [ˈteɪkɒf ǁ ɒːf] noun [countable] COMMERCE the time when an activity, business, industry, or economy starts being successful: • The business enjoyed a fast takeoff …   Financial and business terms

  • takeoff — [n1] leaving ascent, climb, departure, hop, jump, launch, liftoff, rise, upward flight; concept 148 Ant. arrival, coming, landing takeoff [n2] mockery, satire burlesque, caricature, cartoon, comedy, imitation, lampoon, mocking, parody, ridicule,… …   New thesaurus

  • takeoff — (n.) also take off, caricature, colloquial, 1846, from earlier sense of thing that detracts from something, drawback (1826), from TAKE (Cf. take) (v.) + OFF (Cf. off). Meaning act of becoming airborne is from 1904 in reference to aircraft; in… …   Etymology dictionary

  • takeoff — [tāk′ôf΄] n. 1. the act of leaving the ground from any angle, as in jumping, launching, or flight: cf. LIFTOFF 2. the place from which one leaves a surface 3. ☆ a) the starting point or launching stage b) Econ. the early stages of rapid, self… …   English World dictionary

  • takeoff — [[t]te͟ɪkɒf, AM ɔːf[/t]] takeoffs also take off 1) N VAR Takeoff is the beginning of a flight, when an aircraft leaves the ground. The aircraft crashed after takeoff from Heathrow in a reservoir... The commuter plane was waiting for takeoff... 2) …   English dictionary

  • takeoff — {n.} 1. Departure of an airplane; the act of becoming airborne. * /The nervous passenger was relieved that we had such a wonderfully smooth takeoff./ 2. Imitation; a parody. * /Vaughn Meader used to do a wonderful takeoff on President Kennedy s… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • takeoff — {n.} 1. Departure of an airplane; the act of becoming airborne. * /The nervous passenger was relieved that we had such a wonderfully smooth takeoff./ 2. Imitation; a parody. * /Vaughn Meader used to do a wonderful takeoff on President Kennedy s… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • takeoff — noun a) The rising or ascent aircraft or rocket into flight. The flight was smooth, but the takeoff was a little rough. b) A parody or lampoon of someone or something …   Wiktionary

  • takeoff — noun 1. Departure of an airplane; the act of becoming airborne. The nervous passenger was relieved that we had such a wonderfully smooth takeoff. 2. Imitation; a parody. Vaughn Meader used to do a wonderful takeoff on President Kennedy s speech …   Словарь американских идиом

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