take in
transitive verb Date: circa 1515 1. to draw into a smaller compass <
take in the slack of a line
>
: a. furl b. to make (a garment) smaller by enlarging seams or tucks 2. a. to receive as a guest or lodger b. to give shelter to c. to take to a police station as a prisoner 3. to receive as payment or proceeds 4. to receive (work) into one's house to be done for pay <
take in washing
>
5. to encompass within its limits 6. a. to include in an itinerary b. attend <
take in a movie
>
7. to receive into the mind ; perceive <
took in the view
>
8. deceive, dupe

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Take-in — n. Imposition; fraud. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • take in — {v.} 1. To include. * /The country s boundaries were changed to fake in a piece of land beyond the river./ * /The class of mammals takes in nearly all warm blooded animals except the birds./ 2. To go and see; visit. * /The students decided to… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take in — {v.} 1. To include. * /The country s boundaries were changed to fake in a piece of land beyond the river./ * /The class of mammals takes in nearly all warm blooded animals except the birds./ 2. To go and see; visit. * /The students decided to… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take-in — noun Date: 1778 an act of taking in especially by deceiving …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • take in stride — {v. phr.} To meet happenings without too much surprise; accept good or bad luck and go on. * /He learned to take disappointments in stride./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take in tow — {v. phr.} To take charge of; lead; conduct. * /Brian and Kate took a group of children in tow when they went to see the circus./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take in stride — {v. phr.} To meet happenings without too much surprise; accept good or bad luck and go on. * /He learned to take disappointments in stride./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take in tow — {v. phr.} To take charge of; lead; conduct. * /Brian and Kate took a group of children in tow when they went to see the circus./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take in vain — phrasal to use (a name) profanely or without proper respect …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • To take in — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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