take one's time
phrasal to be leisurely about doing something

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • take one's time — {v. phr.} To avoid haste; act in an unhurried way. * /He liked to take his time over breakfast./ * /It is better to take your time at this job than to hurry and make mistakes./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take one's time — {v. phr.} To avoid haste; act in an unhurried way. * /He liked to take his time over breakfast./ * /It is better to take your time at this job than to hurry and make mistakes./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take one's leave — or[take leave of] {v. phr.}, {formal} To say good bye and leave. * /He stayed on after most of the guests had taken their leave./ * /The messenger bowed and took leave of the queen./ [leave taking] {n.} The end of school in June is a time of… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take one's leave — or[take leave of] {v. phr.}, {formal} To say good bye and leave. * /He stayed on after most of the guests had taken their leave./ * /The messenger bowed and took leave of the queen./ [leave taking] {n.} The end of school in June is a time of… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To take one's own course — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take one's measure — measure meas ure (m[e^]zh [ u]r; 135), n. [OE. mesure, F. mesure, L. mensura, fr. metiri, mensus, to measure; akin to metrum poetical measure, Gr. me tron, E. meter. Cf. {Immense}, {Mensuration}, {Mete} to measure.] 1. A standard of dimension; a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ...Baby One More Time — Baby One More Time …   Wikipedia

  • To take upon one's self — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To break one's fast — Fast Fast, n. [OE. faste, fast; cf. AS. f[ae]sten, OHG. fasta, G. faste. See {Fast}, v. i.] 1. Abstinence from food; omission to take nourishment. [1913 Webster] Surfeit is the father of much fast. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Voluntary abstinence… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall into one's hands — Fall Fall (f[add]l), v. i. [imp. {Fell} (f[e^]l); p. p. {Fallen} (f[add]l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Falling}.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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