take a back seat
phrasal to have or assume a secondary position or status

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • take a back seat — To withdraw into an inconspicuous or subordinate position • • • Main Entry: ↑back take a back seat To adopt a passive or subordinate role • • • Main Entry: ↑seat * * * take or be given a less important position or role printed words will take a… …   Useful english dictionary

  • take a back seat — ► to become less important (than something else): »Agriculture, which generates only about $50 million a year in revenue, takes a back seat to other industries like oil and gas that bring in billions of dollars. »Environmental issues take a back… …   Financial and business terms

  • take a back seat — If you take a back seat to something or someone, you are surbordinate …   The small dictionary of idiomes

  • take a back seat — 1. if an activity takes a back seat, you spend less time doing that than other things. He s been putting all his energies into house hunting recently so his studies have had to take a back seat. In my early twenties, politics very much took a… …   New idioms dictionary

  • take a back seat — 1) to deliberately become less active, and give up trying to control things I ll be happy to take a back seat when Robin takes over. 2) to become less important take a back seat to: Other issues must take a back seat to this crisis …   English dictionary

  • take a back seat — {v. phr.}, {informal} To accept a poorer or lower position; be second to something or someone else. * /During the war all manufacturing had to take a back seat to military needs./ * /She does not have to take a back seat to any singer alive./… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take a back seat — {v. phr.}, {informal} To accept a poorer or lower position; be second to something or someone else. * /During the war all manufacturing had to take a back seat to military needs./ * /She does not have to take a back seat to any singer alive./… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take\ a\ back\ seat — v. phr. informal To accept a poorer or lower position; be second to something or someone else. During the war all manufacturing had to take a back seat to military needs. She does not have to take a back seat to any singer alive. Compare: play… …   Словарь американских идиом

  • take a back seat —    If you take a back seat you choose to have a less important function and become less involved in something.     He decided it was time to take a back seat and let someone younger run the club …   English Idioms & idiomatic expressions

  • take a back seat — accept a poorer or lower position, be second to something or someone I had to take a back seat to my partner when we went on the business trip …   Idioms and examples

  • take a back seat — say you are not as good, play second fiddle    You are good at chess. Don t take a back seat to anyone! …   English idioms

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