table wine
noun Date: 1673 an unfortified wine containing not more than 14 percent alcohol by volume and usually suitable for serving with food

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • table wine — table wines N MASS Table wine is fairly cheap wine that is drunk with meals …   English dictionary

  • table wine — table .wine n [U and C] a fairly cheap wine …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • table wine — table ,wine noun count or uncount an ordinary wine that is not very expensive and is drunk with meals …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • table wine — ► NOUN ▪ wine of moderate quality considered suitable for drinking with a meal …   English terms dictionary

  • table wine — n. a still and usually dry wine for serving with meals, usually containing no more than 14 percent alcohol by volume …   English World dictionary

  • Table wine — In the United States, table wine is used as a legal definition to differentiate standard wine from stronger (higher alcohol content) fortified wine or sparkling wine [ [http://www.eosvintage.com/glossary.html EOS Wine Glossary ] ] .In the… …   Wikipedia

  • table wine — noun wine containing not more than 14 percent alcohol usually served with a meal • Hypernyms: ↑wine, ↑vino • Hyponyms: ↑vin ordinaire * * * noun, pl ⋯ wines [count, noncount] : a wine that is not very expensive and that is used for ordinary meals …   Useful english dictionary

  • table wine — UK / US noun [countable/uncountable] Word forms table wine : singular table wine plural table wines an ordinary wine that is not very expensive and that is drunk with meals …   English dictionary

  • table wine — regular wine, wine that is served at the dinner table …   English contemporary dictionary

  • table wine — noun a) Wine that isnt fortified or sparkling. b) A low quality wine, suitable for drinking at mealtimes …   Wiktionary

  • table wine — ta′ble wine n. vin wine that is usu. served with food and contains not more than 14 percent alcohol • Etymology: 1820–30 …   From formal English to slang

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