bicyclic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1909 1. consisting of or arranged in two cycles 2. containing two usually fused rings in the structure of the molecule

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bicyclic — Bi*cyc lic, a. Relating to bicycles. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bicyclic — [bī sīk′lik] adj. 1. of or forming two cycles 2. Chem. containing only two fused rings in the molecule: Also bicyclical …   English World dictionary

  • bicyclic — Cyclic Cyc lic (s?k l?k or s? kl?k), Cyclical Cyc lic*al (s?k l? kal), a. [Cf. F. cycluque, Gr. kykliko s, fr. ky klos See {Cycle}.] 1. Of or pertaining to a cycle or circle; moving in cycles; as, cyclical time. Coleridge. [1913 Webster] 2.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bicyclic — 1. adjective a) Having two cycles. b) Having two rings of atoms in the molecule; the rings may be fused, as in naphthalene, or separate, as in …   Wiktionary

  • bicyclic — /buy suy klik, sik lik/, adj. 1. consisting of or having two cycles or circles. 2. Bot. in two whorls, as the stamens of a flower. 3. pertaining to or resembling a bicycle. Also, bicyclical. [1875 80; BI 1 + CYCLIC] * * * …   Universalium

  • bicyclic — bi·cy·clic ( )bī sī klik, sik lik adj containing two usu. fused rings in the structure of the molecule …   Medical dictionary

  • bicyclic — adj. with two circles or rings; (Chemistry) having two rings of atoms (describing a molecule); (Botany) comprised of or in two different spiral or circular arrangements of leaves or flowers …   English contemporary dictionary

  • bicyclic — [bʌɪ sʌɪklɪk, sɪk ] adjective Chemistry having two fused rings of atoms in its molecule …   English new terms dictionary

  • bicyclic — bi·cy·clic …   English syllables

  • bicyclic — bi•cy•clic [[t]baɪˈsaɪ klɪk, ˈsɪk lɪk[/t]] adj. 1) Also, bi•cy′cli•cal. consisting of or having two cycles or circles. 2) chem. containing two rings of atoms in a molecule • Etymology: 1875–80 …   From formal English to slang

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