squiffed
or squiffy adjective Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1855 intoxicated, drunk

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • squiffed — AND squiffy [skAvift AND “skAvifi] mod. alcohol intoxicated. □ She was a little squiffed, but still entertaining. □ The hostess was so squiffed she could hardly stand …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • squiffed — /skwift/, adj. Slang. intoxicated. [1870 75; orig. uncert.] * * * …   Universalium

  • squiffed — adjective /ˈskwɪft/ intoxicated See Also: squiffy …   Wiktionary

  • squiffed — adj. sl. = SQUIFFY …   Useful english dictionary

  • squiffy — adjective see squiffed …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • squiffy — [skwiftskwif′ē] adj. squiffier, squiffiest 〚< dial. skew whiff, askew, tipsy + Y3〛 [Informal, Chiefly Brit.] drunk; intoxicated: also squiffed [skwift] * * * …   Universalium

  • squiffy — adjective /ˈskwɪf.i/ a) slightly drunk or intoxicated; tipsy In the Palace bar. Id been there an hour or so with two or three other chaps. I was a bit squiffy. b) Crooked, askew; awry To this day I cannot and will not wear a tie properly. On the… …   Wiktionary

  • drinking — (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Swallowing a liquid Nouns 1. drinking, imbibing, potation, libation; social drinking; bacchanalia; blue law; cocktail party, open or cash bar; bring your own bottle or booze, BYOB, compotation, keg party;… …   English dictionary for students

  • wasted —    American drunk    Not from spilling the liquid or resultant bodily emaciation:     To an American, the word bar suggests a place to get either happily squiffed or unhappily wasted. {Travel and leisure, 1990) …   How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • squiffy — adjective (squiffier, squiffiest) Brit. informal 1》 (N. Amer. also squiffed) slightly drunk. 2》 askew; awry. Origin C19: of unknown origin …   English new terms dictionary

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