verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin abdicatus, past participle of abdicare, from ab- + dicare to proclaim — more at diction Date: 1541 transitive verb 1. to cast off ; discard 2. to relinquish (as sovereign power) formally intransitive verb to renounce a throne, high office, dignity, or functionabdicable adjectiveabdication nounabdicator noun Synonyms: abdicate, renounce, resign mean to give up a position with no possibility of resuming it. abdicate implies a giving up of sovereign power or sometimes an evading of responsibility such as that of a parent <
abdicated the throne
. renounce may replace it but often implies additionally a sacrifice for a greater end <
renounced her inheritance by marrying a commoner
. resign applies to the giving up of an unexpired office or trust <
resigned from the board

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Abdicate — Ab di*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Abdicated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Abdicating}.] [L. abdicatus, p. p. of abdicare; ab + dicare to proclaim, akin to dicere to say. See {Diction}.] 1. To surrender or relinquish, as sovereign power; to withdraw… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Abdicate — Ab di*cate, v. i. To relinquish or renounce a throne, or other high office or dignity. [1913 Webster] Though a king may abdicate for his own person, he cannot abdicate for the monarchy. Burke. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • abdicate — abdicate, renounce, resign are synonymous when they are used in the sense of to give up formally or definitely a position of trust, honor, or glory, or its concomitant authority or prerogatives. Abdicate is the precise word to use when that which …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • abdicate — I verb abandon, back out, be relieved, cede, demit, drop, forego, forfeit, give the reins to, give up, hand over, hold off, leave, let go, make way for, quit one s hold, relinquish, resign, retire, stand aside, surrender, unclench, vacate office …   Law dictionary

  • abdicate — (v.) 1540s, to disown, disinherit (children), from L. abdicatus, pp. of abdicare to disown, disavow, reject (specifically abdicare magistratu renounce office ), from ab away (see AB (Cf. ab )) + dicare proclaim, from stem of dicere to speak, to… …   Etymology dictionary

  • abdicate — [v] give up a right, position, or power abandon, abjure, abnegate, bag it*, bail out*, cede, demit, drop, forgo, give up, leave, leave high and dry*, leave holding the bag*, leave in the lurch*, opt out*, quit, quitclaim, relinquish, renounce,… …   New thesaurus

  • abdicate — ► VERB 1) (of a monarch) renounce the throne. 2) fail to fulfil or undertake (a duty). DERIVATIVES abdication noun. ORIGIN Latin abdicare renounce …   English terms dictionary

  • abdicate — [ab′di kāt΄] vt., vi. abdicated, abdicating [< L abdicatus, pp. of abdicare, to deny, renounce < ab , off + dicare, to proclaim, akin to dicere, to say: see DICTION] 1. to give up formally (a high office, throne, authority, etc.) 2. to… …   English World dictionary

  • abdicate — UK [ˈæbdɪkeɪt] / US [ˈæbdɪˌkeɪt] verb Word forms abdicate : present tense I/you/we/they abdicate he/she/it abdicates present participle abdicating past tense abdicated past participle abdicated 1) [intransitive/transitive] if a king or queen… …   English dictionary

  • abdicate — verb /ˈæbdɪkeɪt/ a) To surrender, renounce or relinquish, as sovereign power; to withdraw definitely from filling or exercising, as a high office, station, dignity; as, to abdicate the throne, the crown, the papacy. Note: The word abdicate was… …   Wiktionary

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