betake
transitive verb (betook; betaken; -taking) Date: 14th century 1. archaic commit 2. to cause (oneself) to go

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Betake — Be*take , v. t. [imp. {Betook}; p. p. {Betaken}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Betaking}.] [Pref. be + take.] 1. To take or seize. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. To have recourse to; to apply; to resort; to go; with a reflexive pronoun. [1913 Webster] They …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • betake — ► VERB (past betook; past part. betaken) (betake oneself to) literary ▪ go to …   English terms dictionary

  • betake — (v.) c.1200, from BE (Cf. be ) + TAKE (Cf. take). Related: Betook; betaken …   Etymology dictionary

  • betake — [bē tāk′, bitāk′] vt. betook [betook′] betaken, betaking [ME bitaken: see BE & TAKE] 1. to go: used reflexively [he betook himself to his own kingdom] 2. Archaic to direct or devote (oneself) …   English World dictionary

  • betake — verb /bɪˈteɪk/ a) To go or move. a rain cloud [...] had betaken a dusky brown color, and about its lower verge a fringe of fine straight lines of rain was suggested [...]. b) To commit to a specified action. I was glad of my arrival for I was… …   Wiktionary

  • betake — verb (past betook; past participle betaken) (betake oneself to) literary go to …   English new terms dictionary

  • betake — verb past tense betook, past participle betaken betake yourself to literary to go somewhere …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • betake — /bi tayk /, v.t., betook, betaken, betaking. 1. to cause to go (usually used reflexively): She betook herself to town. 2. Archaic. to resort or have recourse to. [1175 1225; ME bitaken. See BE , TAKE] * * * …   Universalium

  • betake — v. (formal and obsol.) (P; refl.) he betook himself to the fair * * * [bɪ teɪk] (formal and obsol.) (P; refl.) he betook himself to the fair …   Combinatory dictionary

  • betake — v. a. == take. RG. 526 == give in charge to a person, i.e. cause another to take. RG. 201, 354; so ‘was bitake four erles,’ == was given in charge ‘to four earls.’ RG. 523; see p. 301. Hence == commend to a person, RG. 475; ‘hand over to… …   Oldest English Words

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