noun Etymology: obsolete snick or snee to engage in cut-and-thrust fighting, alteration of earlier steake or snye, from Dutch steken of snijden to thrust or cut Date: circa 1775 a large knife

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • snickersnee — 1690s, originally fight with knives, from snick or snee (1610s), from Du. steken to thrust, stick + snijden to cut (Cf. Ger. schneiden) …   Etymology dictionary

  • snickersnee — [snik′ər snē΄] n. [< snick or snee, earlier stick or snee, combat with knives < Du steken, to thrust, stab + snijden, to cut] Rare a large knife, designed for use as a thrusting and cutting weapon …   English World dictionary

  • snickersnee — /snik euhr snee /, n. a knife, esp. one used as a weapon. [1690 1700; var. (by alliterative assimilation) of earlier stick or snee to thrust or cut < D steken to STICK2 + snij(d)en to cut] * * * …   Universalium

  • snickersnee — noun /ˌsnɪk.əˈsniː,ˌsnɪk.ɚˈsniː/ a) A large sword like knife, especially one used as a weapon. As he squirmed and struggled, b) A knife fight. And gurgled and guggled, See Also: snick or snee, snicker snack …   Wiktionary

  • snickersnee — snick·er snee || ‚snɪkÉ™(r)snɪː n. large knife that looks like a sword; act of fighting with knives (Archaic) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • snickersnee — snick·er·snee …   English syllables

  • snickersnee — snick•er•snee [[t]ˈsnɪk ərˌsni[/t]] n. mil a knife, esp. one used as a weapon • Etymology: 1690–1700; alter. (by alliterative assimilation) of earlier stick or snee to thrust or cut < D steken to stick II+snij(d) en to cut …   From formal English to slang

  • snickersnee —   n. jocular, large knife, cutlass etc.; knife fight …   Dictionary of difficult words

  • snickersnee — noun fighting with knives • Syn: ↑knife fight, ↑cut and thrust • Hypernyms: ↑fight, ↑fighting, ↑combat, ↑scrap …   Useful english dictionary

  • Snickers — Snickers …   Википедия

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