Skeltonics
noun plural Etymology: John Skelton Date: 1898 short verses of an irregular meter with two or three stresses sometimes in falling and sometimes in rising rhythm and usually with rhymed couplets

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Skeltonics — ▪ poetry       short verses of an irregular metre much used by the Tudor poet John Skelton (Skelton, John). The verses have two or three stresses arranged sometimes in falling and sometimes in rising rhythm. They rely on such devices as… …   Universalium

  • skeltonics — skel·ton·ics …   English syllables

  • skeltonics — skelˈtäniks noun plural Usage: usually capitalized : short verses of an irregular meter much used by John Skelton having two or three stresses arranged sometimes in falling and sometimes in rising rhythm and usually rhymed in couplets …   Useful english dictionary

  • Skelton, John — born с 1460 died June 21, 1529, London, Eng. English poet. Appointed court poet to Henry VII in 1489, Skelton became a tutor and eventually an adviser to Henry VIII. In 1498 he took holy orders. He wrote political and religious satires in an… …   Universalium

  • Doggerel — is a derogatory term for verse considered of little literary value. The word probably derived from dog, suggesting either ugliness, or unpalatability (as in food fit only for dogs).[1] Contents 1 Etymology 2 Variants 3 …   Wikipedia

  • SKELTON, John — (c. 1460 1529) Primarily known as a poet and satirist of unusual technique, the flamboyant John Skelton was also a scholar and clergyman during the reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII.* Born around 1460 in Yorkshire, Skelton was laureated by… …   Renaissance and Reformation 1500-1620: A Biographical Dictionary

  • SKELTON (J.) — SKELTON JOHN (1460 env. 1529) Poète anglais, longtemps négligé, John Skelton refait surface grâce à l’admiration que lui ont vouée quelques poètes modernes, dont W. H. Auden, qui lui a consacré un essai en 1935 (The Great Tudors ), et Robert… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Skelton, John — (?1460 1529)    Tudor poet whose poetic style of short rhyming lines, based on natural speech rhythms, has been given the name of Skeltonics. Possibly from Diss, Norfolk, he studied at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge and was academic… …   British and Irish poets

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