simple fracture
noun Date: 1597 a bone fracture that does not form an open wound in the skin — compare compound fracture

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Simple fracture — Fracture Frac ture (?; 135), n. [L. fractura, fr. frangere, fractum, to break: cf. F. fracture. See {Fraction}.] 1. The act of breaking or snapping asunder; rupture; breach. [1913 Webster] 2. (Surg.) The breaking of a bone. [1913 Webster] 3. (Min …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • simple fracture — n a bone fracture that does not form an open wound in the skin compare COMPOUND FRACTURE * * * closed f …   Medical dictionary

  • simple fracture — n medical an injury in which a bone in your body is broken but does not cut through the flesh that surrounds it →↑compound fracture …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • simple fracture — ► NOUN ▪ a fracture of the bone only, without damage to the surrounding tissues or breaking of the skin …   English terms dictionary

  • simple fracture — n. a bone fracture in which the broken ends of bone do not pierce the skin …   English World dictionary

  • simple fracture — noun an uncomplicated fracture in which the broken bones to not pierce the skin • Syn: ↑closed fracture • Hypernyms: ↑fracture, ↑break * * * noun, pl ⋯ tures [count] medical : a break in a bone in which no parts stick out through the skin compare …   Useful english dictionary

  • simple fracture — a fracture in which the bone does not pierce the skin. Also called closed fracture. [1590 1600] * * * …   Universalium

  • simple fracture — noun a fracture of the bone only, without damage to the surrounding tissues or breaking of the skin …   English new terms dictionary

  • simple fracture — noun (C) technical a broken or cracked bone that does not cut through the flesh that surrounds it compare compound fracture …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • simple fracture — sim′ple frac′ture n. pat a fracture in which the bone does not pierce the skin • Etymology: 1590–1600 …   From formal English to slang

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