noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1940 slang a stupid or unimportant person ; dolt

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • schnook — [ʃnuk] n AmE informal [Date: 1900 2000; Origin: Perhaps from German schnucke small sheep or Yiddish shnuk snout ] a stupid person …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • schnook — [ ʃnuk ] noun count AMERICAN INFORMAL someone who is stupid …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • schnook — (n.) 1948, probably from Yiddish shnuk elephant s trunk, or altered from SCHMUCK (Cf. schmuck) (q.v.), or perhaps from Ger. schnucke a small sheep, used in U.S. Yiddish for a customer easily persuaded, a sucker …   Etymology dictionary

  • schnook — ☆ schnook [shnook ] n. [< Yiddish ? altered < SCHMUCK] Slang a person easily imposed upon or cheated; pitifully meek person …   English World dictionary

  • schnook — noun A person who is easily taken advantage of. He’s just a schnook. She’s obviously using him but he keeps coming back for more abuse …   Wiktionary

  • schnook — AND schnuck; shnook [Jnuk] n. a naive person; a dope. (Yiddish.) □ The guy’s a schnook with a heart of gold. □ What’s a good looking dame like her doing with a shnook like him? …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • schnook — /shnook/, n. Slang. an unimportant or stupid person; dope. [1945 50, Amer.; of uncert. orig.] * * * …   Universalium

  • schnook — n American an unfortunate, timid or pathetic per son. The word is Yiddish, but apparently was coined in the USA. It is probably related to the German schnucki: dar ling, or schnuck: a small sheep …   Contemporary slang

  • schnook — n. fool, stupid person (Slang) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • schnook —    (shnook) [Yiddish] In slang, a stupid person; a dope; a sad sack; a pathetic case.    Those who looked truly and stupendously dumb were the poor schnooks who had to stand on camera and talk about the fact that they didn’t know very much about… …   Dictionary of foreign words and phrases

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”