rootle
intransitive verb (rootled; rootling) Etymology: frequentative of 3root Date: 1809 root III

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • rootle — [ro͞ot′ l] vi. rootled, rootling Brit. ROOT2 (vi. 1 & 2) * * * …   Universalium

  • rootle — [ro͞ot′ l] vi. rootled, rootling Brit. ROOT2 (vi. 1 & 2) …   English World dictionary

  • rootle — root|le [ˈru:tl] v also rootle around/about [i]BrE informal to search for something by moving many other things around >rootle n [singular] …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • rootle — UK [ˈruːt(ə)l] / US [ˈrut(ə)l] verb [intransitive] Word forms rootle : present tense I/you/we/they rootle he/she/it rootles present participle rootling past tense rootled past participle rootled British informal to search by moving things around… …   English dictionary

  • rootle — also rootle around/about verb (I) BrE informal to search for something by moving many other things around …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • rootle — verb (of an animal) to dig into the ground, with the snout Once, presumably, this quadrangle with its smooth lawns, its massive buildings, and the chapel itself was marsh too, where the grasses waved and the swine rootled …   Wiktionary

  • rootle — verb Brit. informal term for root2. Origin C19: frequentative of root2 …   English new terms dictionary

  • rootle — roo·tle …   English syllables

  • rootle — /ˈrutəl/ (say roohtuhl) verb (i) (rootled, rootling) to root or grub; rummage. {root2 + le} …   Australian English dictionary

  • rootle — v.intr. & tr. Brit. = ROOT(2) 1, 2. Etymology: ROOT(2) …   Useful english dictionary

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