ronyon
noun Etymology: perhaps modification of Middle French rogne scab Date: 1598 obsolete a mangy or scabby creature

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Ronyon — Ronion Ron ion, Ronyon Ron yon, n. [F. rogne scab, mange.] A mangy or scabby creature. [1913 Webster] Aroint thee, with! the rump fed ronyon cries. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ronyon — noun ( s) Etymology: perhaps modification of French rogue scab, mange obsolete : a mangy or scabby creature * * * ronyon see runnion …   Useful english dictionary

  • ronyon — /run yeuhn/, n. Obs. a mangy creature. Also, ronion. [1590 1600; perh. < F rogne mange] * * * …   Universalium

  • ronyon —    An obscure term used by Shakespeare in The Merry Wives of Windsor and Macbeth, in the former as a vocative. It appears to mean a fat, bulky woman. See also quotation under Witch …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • Ronion — Ron ion, Ronyon Ron yon, n. [F. rogne scab, mange.] A mangy or scabby creature. [1913 Webster] Aroint thee, with! the rump fed ronyon cries. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Aroint — A*roint ([.a]*roint ), interj. [Cf. Prov. E. rynt, rynt thee, roynt, or runt, terms used by milkmaids to a cow that has been milked, in order to drive her away, to make room for others; AS. r[=y]man to make room or way, fr. r[=u]m room. The final …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rump-fed — Rump fed, a. A Shakespearean word of uncertain meaning. Perhaps fattened in the rump, pampered. The rump fed ronyon. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ronion — /run yeuhn/, n. Obs. ronyon. * * * …   Universalium

  • hag —    A word which means an ugly old woman, a witch. It is a strong term of abuse in Shakespeare, expressing extreme disgust and contempt. Perhaps his most famous use of the term, apart from the ‘secret, black and midnight hags’ of Macbeth, is in… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • witch —    There is a big difference in modern usage between ‘you witch’, said to a young woman, and ‘you old witch’ said to an older woman. The former term is complimentary, meaning that the person concerned is bewitching in appearance. The latter term… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

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