revet
transitive verb (revetted; revetting) Etymology: French revêtir, literally, to clothe, put on, from Old French revestir, from Latin revestire, from re- + vestire to clothe — more at vest Date: 1812 to face (as an embankment) with a revetment

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • revêt — revêt …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Revet — Re*vet (r[ e]*v[e^]t ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Revetted};p. pr. & vb. n. {Revetting}.] [See {Revetment}.] (Mil. & Civil Engineering) To face, as an embankment, with masonry, wood, or other material. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • revet — [ri vet′] vt. revetted, revetting [Fr revêtir < OFr revestir: see REVEST] to provide or protect with a revetment …   English World dictionary

  • revet — /ri vet /, v.t., revetted, revetting. to face, as an embankment, with masonry or other material. [1805 15; < F revêtir lit., to reclothe; cf. REVEST] * * * …   Universalium

  • revet — verb To face, as an embankment, with masonry, wood, or other material …   Wiktionary

  • revet — brevet …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • revet — rɪ vet v. cover a wall or embankment with stone or cement …   English contemporary dictionary

  • revet — evert …   Anagrams dictionary

  • revet — [rɪ vɛt] verb (revets, revetting, revetted) [usu. as adjective revetted] face (a rampart, wall, etc.) with masonry, especially in fortification. Origin C19: from Fr. revêtir, from late L. revestire, from re again + vestire clothe …   English new terms dictionary

  • revet — re·vet …   English syllables

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