resource
noun Etymology: French ressource, from Old French ressourse relief, resource, from resourdre to relieve, literally, to rise again, from Latin resurgere — more at resurrection Date: circa 1611 1. a. a source of supply or support ; an available means — usually used in plural b. a natural source of wealth or revenue — often used in plural c. a natural feature or phenomenon that enhances the quality of human life d. computable wealth — usually used in plural e. a source of information or expertise 2. something to which one has recourse in difficulty ; expedient 3. a possibility of relief or recovery 4. a means of spending one's leisure time 5. an ability to meet and handle a situation ; resourcefulness Synonyms: resource, resort, expedient, shift, makeshift, stopgap mean something one turns to in the absence of the usual means or source of supply. resource and resort apply to anything one falls back upon <
exhausted all of their resources
>
<
a last resort
>
. expedient may apply to any device or contrivance used when the usual one is not at hand or not possible <
a flimsy expedient
>
. shift implies a tentative or temporary imperfect expedient <
desperate shifts to stave off foreclosure
>
. makeshift implies an inferior expedient adopted because of urgent need or allowed through indifference <
old equipment employed as a makeshift
>
. stopgap applies to something used temporarily as an emergency measure <
a new law intended only as a stopgap
>
.

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • resource — Resource …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • resource — 1 in plural form resources assets, belongings, effects, *possessions, means 2 Resource, resort, expedient, shift, makeshift, stopgap, substitute, surrogate can all denote something to which one turns for help or assistance in difficulty or need… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • resource — resource, resort, recourse 1. The three words all have to do with finding help or support and are chiefly distinguished from one another by the typical phrase patterns in which they operate. These are given in the table below. resource a simple… …   Modern English usage

  • resource — [rē′sôrs΄, rē′zôrs΄; ri sôrs′, rizôrs′] n. [Fr ressource < OFr < resourdre, to arise anew < re , again + sourdre, to spring up < L surgere: see SURGE] 1. something that lies ready for use or that can be drawn upon for aid or to take… …   English World dictionary

  • Resource — Re*source (r?*s?rs ), n. [F. ressource, fr. OF. ressourdre, resourdre, to spring forth or up again; pref. re re + sourdre to spring forth. See {Source}.] 1. That to which one resorts orr on which one depends for supply or support; means of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • resource — I noun accumulation, asset, available means, capital, contrivance, dependence, device, essential, estate, expedient, facultates, fund, income, instrument, material, means, property, provision, reserve, reserve fund, resort, revenue, source, stock …   Law dictionary

  • Resource —   [engl.], Ressource …   Universal-Lexikon

  • resource — 1610s, means of supplying a want or deficiency, from Fr. resourse, from fem. pp. of O.Fr. resourdre to rally, raise again, from L. resurgere rise again (see RESURGENT (Cf. resurgent)). Resources a country s wealth first recorded 1779 …   Etymology dictionary

  • resource — [n] supply drawn upon, either material or nonmaterial ability, appliance, artifice, assets, capability, capital, cleverness, contraption, contrivance, course, creation, device, expedient, fortune, hoard, ingenuity, initiative, inventiveness,… …   New thesaurus

  • resource — ► NOUN 1) (resources) a stock or supply of materials or assets that can be drawn on in order to function effectively. 2) (resources) a country s collective means of supporting itself or becoming wealthier, as represented by its minerals, land,… …   English terms dictionary

  • Resource — A resource is any physical or virtual entity of limited availability, or anything used to help one earn a living.fact|date=February 2008 In most cases, commercial or even ethic factors require resource allocation through resource management.Types …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”