reprove
verb (reproved; reproving) Etymology: Middle English repreven, reproven, from Anglo-French reprover, from Late Latin reprobare to disapprove, condemn, from Latin re- + probare to test, approve — more at prove Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to scold or correct usually gently or with kindly intent 2. to express disapproval of ; censure <
it is not for me to reprove popular taste — D. W. Brogan
>
3. obsolete disprove, refute 4. obsolete convince, convict intransitive verb to express rebuke or reproof • reprover nounreprovingly adverb Synonyms: reprove, rebuke, reprimand, admonish, reproach, chide mean to criticize adversely. reprove implies an often kindly intent to correct a fault <
gently reproved my table manners
>
. rebuke suggests a sharp or stern reproof <
the papal letter rebuked dissenting clerics
>
. reprimand implies a severe, formal, often public or official rebuke <
reprimanded by the ethics committee
>
. admonish suggests earnest or friendly warning and counsel <
admonished by my parents to control expenses
>
. reproach and chide suggest displeasure or disappointment expressed in mild reproof or scolding <
reproached him for tardiness
>
<
chided by their mother for untidiness
>
.

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Reprove — Re*prove (r? pr??v ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reproved} ( pr??vd ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reproving}.] [F. r[ e]prouver, OF. reprover, fr. L. reprobare. See {Reprieve}, {Reprobate}, and cf. {Reproof}.] 1. To convince. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] When he is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reprove — reprove, rebuke, reprimand, admonish, reproach, chide can all mean to criticize adversely, especially in order to warn of or to correct a fault. To reprove is to blame or censure, often kindly or without harshness and usually in the hope of… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • reprove — index admonish (warn), advise, blame, browbeat, castigate, censure, comment, complain ( …   Law dictionary

  • reprove — c.1300, from O.Fr. reprover, from L.L. reprobare disapprove, reject, condemn (see REPROBATE (Cf. reprobate)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • reprove — [v] rebuke admonish, bawl out*, berate, castigate, censure, chew out*, chide, condemn, jump down one’s throat*, lambaste, lay into*, lecture, read the riot act*, reprimand, reproach, scold, take to task*, upbraid; concepts 44,52 …   New thesaurus

  • reprove — ► VERB ▪ rebuke or reprimand. ORIGIN Old French reprover, from late Latin reprobare disapprove …   English terms dictionary

  • reprove — [ri pro͞ov′] vt. reproved, reproving [ME reproven < OFr reprouver < LL(Ec) reprobare: see RE & PROVE] 1. to speak to in disapproval; rebuke 2. to express disapproval of (something done or said); censure 3. Obs. to refute; disprove …   English World dictionary

  • reprove — reprover, n. reprovingly, adv. /ri proohv /, v., reproved, reproving. v.t. 1. to criticize or correct, esp. gently: to reprove a pupil for making a mistake. 2. to disapprove of strongly; censure: to reprove a bad decision. 3. Obs. to disprove or… …   Universalium

  • reprove — v. (formal) (D; tr.) to reprove for * * * [rɪ pruːv] (formal) (D; tr.) to reprove for …   Combinatory dictionary

  • reprove — UK [rɪˈpruːv] / US [rɪˈpruv] verb [transitive] Word forms reprove : present tense I/you/we/they reprove he/she/it reproves present participle reproving past tense reproved past participle reproved formal to criticize or blame someone for doing… …   English dictionary

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