repass
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French repasser, from re- + passer to pass Date: 15th century intransitive verb to pass again especially in the opposite direction ; return transitive verb 1. to pass through, over, or by again <
repass the house
>
2. to cause to pass again 3. to adopt again <
repassed the resolution
>
repassage noun

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Repass — Re*pass (r? p?s ), v. t. [Pref. re + pass: cf. F. repasser. Cf. {Repace}.] To pass again; to pass or travel over in the opposite direction; to pass a second time; as, to repass a bridge or a river; to repass the sea. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Repass — Re*pass , v. i. To pass or go back; to move back; as, troops passing and repassing before our eyes. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • repass — mid 15c., from RE (Cf. re ) + PASS (Cf. pass) (v.). Related: Repassed; repassing …   Etymology dictionary

  • repass — [rē pas′, rēpäs′] vi., vt. [Fr repasser] to pass back or again repassage n …   English World dictionary

  • repass — repassage /ree pas ij/, n. /ree pas , pahs /, v.t., v.i. to pass back or again. [1425 75; late ME repassen < MF repasser, OF, equiv. to re RE + passer to PASS] * * * …   Universalium

  • repass — verb /ɹiːˈpɑːs/ To pass (back) again, especially in the opposite direction; to return. Isabell Queene of England, being to repasse from Zeland into her Kingdome with an armie, [...] had utterly beene cast away, had she come unto the Port intended …   Wiktionary

  • repass — re·pass || ‚rɪː pæs / pɑːs v. pass again, go by again …   English contemporary dictionary

  • repass — 1) sparse 2) spares …   Anagrams dictionary

  • repass — verb pass again, especially on the way back …   English new terms dictionary

  • repass — re·pass …   English syllables

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