bawcock
noun Etymology: French beau coq, from beau fine + coq fellow, cock Date: 1599 archaic a fine fellow

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bawcock — Baw cock, n. [From F. beau fine + E. cock (the bird); or more prob. fr. OF. baud bold, gay + E. cock. Cf. {Bawd}.] A fine fellow; a term of endearment. [Obs.] How now, my bawcock ? Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bawcock — [bô′käk΄] n. [< Fr beau, pretty + coq,COCK2] Archaic a good fellow …   English World dictionary

  • bawcock —    An English form of French beau coq, ‘fine cock’, used in the sense of ‘fine fellow’. Shakespeare used it in two of his plays. ‘Good bawcock, bate thy rage!’ is in Henry the Fifth (3:ii). Twelfth Night (3:iv) has: ‘Why, how now, my bawcock.’… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • bawcock — ˈbȯˌkäk noun ( s) Etymology: by folk etymology, from French beau coq, from beau fine + coq fellow, cock (bird) : a fine fellow how now, my bawcock Shakespeare …   Useful english dictionary

  • bawcock — /baw kok /, n. Archaic. (used familiarly) a fine fellow. [1590 1600; < F beau coc fine cock] * * * …   Universalium

  • bawcock — noun A fine fellow …   Wiktionary

  • Bawcock — Recorded in over eighty different spellings throughout Europe, this surname is of pre 7th century Olde French origins. It originates from the word baud meaning joyful , was given probably as a nickname for a lusty and swaggering youth . There is… …   Surnames reference

  • bawcock — baw·cock …   English syllables

  • bawcock — A nice gentleman …   Grandiloquent dictionary

  • Tom Bawcock's Eve — is a festival held on the 23rd of December in Mousehole, Cornwall, UK. The festival is held in celebration and memorial of the efforts of Mousehole resident Tom Bawcock to lift a famine from the village. During this festival Star Gazy pie (a… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”