rear-end
transitive verb Date: 1957 to crash into the back of (as an automobile)

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • rear-end — /rear end /, v.t. 1. to drive a vehicle or other conveyance so as to strike the back end of (another vehicle): My car was rear ended by another driver on the highway. 2. (of a moving vehicle or other conveyance) to strike the back end of (another …   Universalium

  • rear-end — [rir end′] vt. to crash into, or cause one s vehicle to crash into, the back end of (another vehicle) …   English World dictionary

  • rear-end — (something) American to cause an accident by hitting the back of the car in front of you. His car was rear ended while he was stopped at the light …   New idioms dictionary

  • rear-end — rear′ end′ v. t. cvb trs to drive or crash a vehicle into the back end of (another vehicle) • Etymology: 1975–80 …   From formal English to slang

  • rear end — noun count 1. ) the back part of something, especially a vehicle 2. ) INFORMAL the part of your body that you sit on …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • rear-end — verb transitive INFORMAL to drive into the back of another car …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • rear end — rear′ end′ n. 1) the hindmost part of something 2) anat. inf the buttocks …   From formal English to slang

  • rear end — n. 1. the back part of something 2. Slang the buttocks …   English World dictionary

  • rear-end — verb collide with the rear end of The car rear ended me • Hypernyms: ↑hit, ↑strike, ↑impinge on, ↑run into, ↑collide with • Verb Frames: Somebody s something …   Useful english dictionary

  • rear end — {n.} 1. The back part (usually of a vehicle) * /The rear end of our car was smashed when we stopped suddenly and the car behind us hit us./ Often used like an adjective, with a hyphen. * /A head on crash is more likely to kill the passengers than …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • rear end — {n.} 1. The back part (usually of a vehicle) * /The rear end of our car was smashed when we stopped suddenly and the car behind us hit us./ Often used like an adjective, with a hyphen. * /A head on crash is more likely to kill the passengers than …   Dictionary of American idioms

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”