adjective Date: circa 1900 of, relating to, or living in the ocean depths especially between approximately 2000 and 12,000 feet (600 and 3600 meters)

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • bathypelagic — pertaining to the mid waters below the level of light penetration between depths of 2000 and 4000 metres (or 900 3700m, 1000 6000 m, 1000 4000 m or 1000 2500 m, sources differ), e.g. Cyclothone microdon, Argyropelecus aculeatus and Gastrostomus… …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • bathypelagic — /bæθipəˈlædʒɪk/ (say batheepuh lajik) adjective of, relating to, or inhabiting the bathypelagic zone. {bathy + pelagic} …   Australian English dictionary

  • bathypelagic — adj. [Gr. bathys, deep; pelagos, sea] Living on or near the bottom in the depths of the ocean; see epipelagic, mesopelagic …   Dictionary of invertebrate zoology

  • bathypelagic — /bath euh peuh laj ik/, adj. Oceanog. pertaining to or living in the bathyal region of an ocean. [1905 10; BATHY + PELAGIC] * * * …   Universalium

  • bathypelagic — adjective Of or pertaining to the parts of the oceans at depths between 1000 and 4000 meters deep. See Also: bathal zone, epipelagic, mesopelagic, abyssopelagic, hadalpelagic …   Wiktionary

  • bathypelagic — Zone in the ocean deeper than 1000 m below the surface, or pertaining to its inhabitants [Butler, T.H.] …   Crustacea glossary

  • bathypelagic —    Of the deep sea. Refers to the depths between roughly 3000 feet below the surface and the bottom of the sea. No food accumulates in these waters [23] …   Lexicon of Cave and Karst Terminology

  • bathypelagic — [ˌbaθɪpɪ ladʒɪk] adjective Biology (of fish and other organisms) inhabiting the sea at a depth of between about 1,000 and 3,000 metres (approximately 3,300 and 9,800 ft), where it is dark and cold …   English new terms dictionary

  • bathypelagic — bathy·pelagic …   English syllables

  • bathypelagic — bath•y•pe•lag•ic [[t]ˌbæθ ə pəˈlædʒ ɪk[/t]] adj. oce pertaining to or living in the bathyal region of an ocean • Etymology: 1905–10 …   From formal English to slang

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