rancour
British variant of rancor

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • rancour — (n.) British English spelling of RANCOR (Cf. rancor); for ending see OR (Cf. or). Related: Rancourous …   Etymology dictionary

  • rancour — meaning ‘malignant dislike’, is spelt our in BrE and rancor in AmE …   Modern English usage

  • rancour — (US rancor) ► NOUN ▪ bitterness; resentment. DERIVATIVES rancorous adjective. ORIGIN Latin rancor rankness , later bitter grudge …   English terms dictionary

  • rancour — n. 1) to stir up rancour 2) to express; feel; show rancour 3) deep seated rancour 4) rancour against, towards (to feel rancour towards smb.) * * * [ ræŋkə] feel show rancour towards (to feel rancour towards smb.) deep seated rancour to …   Combinatory dictionary

  • rancour — Rancor Ran cor (r[a^][ng] k[ e]r), n. [Written also {rancour}.] [OE. rancour, OF. rancor, rancur, F. rancune, fr. L. rancor rancidity, rankness; tropically, an old grudge, rancor, fr. rancere to be rank or rancid.] The deepest malignity or spite; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rancour — ran|cour BrE rancor AmE [ˈræŋkə US ər] n [U] [Date: 1100 1200; : Old French; Origin: Late Latin, from Latin rancere; RANCID] formal a feeling of hatred and anger towards someone you cannot forgive because they harmed you in the past →↑resentment… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • rancour — [14] To account for rancour and its close relative rancid we have to postulate a Latin verb *rancēre ‘stink’, never actually recorded but inferable from its present participle rancēns ‘stinking, putrid’. From it were derived the adjective… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • rancour — [[t]ræ̱ŋkə(r)[/t]] N UNCOUNT Rancour is a feeling of bitterness and anger. [FORMAL] That s too bad, Teddy said without rancour. Syn: bitterness (in AM, use rancor) …   English dictionary

  • rancour — [14] To account for rancour and its close relative rancid we have to postulate a Latin verb *rancēre ‘stink’, never actually recorded but inferable from its present participle rancēns ‘stinking, putrid’. From it were derived the adjective… …   Word origins

  • rancour — BrE rancor AmE noun (U) formal a feeling of hatred, especially when you cannot forgive someone: He spoke openly about the war without a trace of rancour. rancorous adjective rancorously adverb …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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