prove
verb (proved; proved or proven; proving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French prover, pruver, from Latin probare to test, prove, from probus good, honest, from pro- for, in favor + -bus (akin to Old English bēon to be) — more at pro-, be Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. archaic to learn or find out by experience 2. a. to test the truth, validity, or genuineness of <
the exception proves the rule
>
<
prove a will at probate
>
b. to test the worth or quality of; specifically to compare against a standard — sometimes used with up or out c. to check the correctness of (as an arithmetic result) 3. a. to establish the existence, truth, or validity of (as by evidence or logic) <
prove a theorem
>
<
the charges were never proved in court
>
b. to demonstrate as having a particular quality or worth <
the vaccine has been proven effective after years of tests
>
<
proved herself a great actress
>
4. to show (oneself) to be worthy or capable <
eager to prove myself in the new job
>
intransitive verb to turn out especially after trial or test <
the new drug proved effective
>
provable adjectiveprovableness nounprovably adverbprover noun Usage: The past participle proven, originally the past participle of preve, a Middle English variant of prove that survived in Scotland, has gradually worked its way into standard English over the past three and a half centuries. It seems to have first become established in legal use and to have come only slowly into literary use. Tennyson was one of its earliest frequent users, probably for metrical reasons. It was disapproved by 19th century grammarians, one of whom included it in a list of “words that are not words.” Surveys made some 50 or 60 years ago indicated that proved was about four times as frequent as proven. But our evidence from the last 30 or 35 years shows this no longer to be the case. As a past participle proven is now about as frequent as proved in all contexts. As an attributive adjective <
proved or proven gas reserves
>
proven is much more common than proved.

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • prove — W1S2 [pru:v] v past tense proved past participle proved or proven [ˈpru:vən] especially AmE ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(show something is true)¦ 2¦(be)¦ 3 prove yourself/prove something (to somebody) 4 prove yourself (to be) something 5 what is s …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • prove — [ pruv ] (past participle proved or prov|en [ pruvn ] ) verb *** 1. ) transitive to provide evidence that shows that something is true: prove (that): You have to prove you are sorry for what you ve done. prove someone s innocence/guilt: He is… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Prove — Prove, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Proved}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Proving}.] [OE. prover, F. prouver, fr. L. probare to try, approve, prove, fr. probus good, proper. Cf. {Probable}, {Proof}, {Probe}.] 1. To try or to ascertain by an experiment, or by a test… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • prove — 1 Prove, try, test, demonstrate are comparable when they mean to establish a given or an implied contention or reach a convincing conclusion by such appropriate means as evidence, argument, or experiment. The same distinctions in implications and …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • prove — / prüv/ vt proved, proved, or, prov·en, / prü vən/, prov·ing 1: to test the truth, validity, or genuineness of prove a will at probate 2 a: to establish the existence, truth, or validity of the charges were never …   Law dictionary

  • Prove — Prove, v. i. 1. To make trial; to essay. [1913 Webster] 2. To be found by experience, trial, or result; to turn out to be; as, a medicine proves salutary; the report proves false. The case proves mortal. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] So life a winter …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • prove — ► VERB (past part. proved or proven) 1) demonstrate by evidence or argument the truth or existence of. 2) show or be seen to be: the scheme has proved a great success. 3) (prove oneself) demonstrate one s abilities or courage. 4) Law establish… …   English terms dictionary

  • prove — (v.) late 12c., prouwe, from O.Fr. prover (11c.), from L. probare to test, prove worthy, from probus worthy, good, upright, virtuous, from PIE *pro bhwo being in front, from *pro , extended form of root *per , + root *bhu to be (Cf. L. fui …   Etymology dictionary

  • prove — [pro͞ov] vt. proved, proved or proven, proving [ME proven < OFr prover < L probare: see PROBE] 1. to test by experiment, a standard, etc.; subject to a testing process; try out 2. to establish as true; demonstrate to be a fact 3. to… …   English World dictionary

  • Prove — est dans la mythologie slave le dieu de l équité et des jugements. Il est représenté sous les traits d un vieillard maigre au long vêtement, et ayant pour attributs le serpent, symbole de la prudence, et le fer chaud des ordalies. Jurer par son… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Prove — Prove, bei den alten Wenden an der Ostsee ein gekröntes Götzenbild mit drei Gesichtern, einem Spieß u. einer Pflugschar; in dem ihm geheiligten Eichenhaine wurden ihm Montags Kühe, Schafe u. Vögel geopfert …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

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