banjax

banjax
transitive verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1939 chiefly Irish damage, ruin; also smash

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • banjax — 1. verb /ˈbæn.ʤæks,bænˈʤæks/ To ruin or destroy. Indeed, it seemed that the army was hopelessly banjaxed. 2. noun /ˈbæn.ʤæks,bænˈʤæks/ A mess or undesirable situation made as a result of incompetence. Im tellin you the scholar, Bentham, made a… …   Wiktionary

  • banjax — Mid Ulster English to break/ruin/destroy Hiberno English word, of unknown origin …   English dialects glossary

  • banjax — v. incapacitate, limit ability, disable; stymie, damage or break something (Irish use) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • banjax — [ bandʒaks] verb informal ruin or incapacitate. Origin 1930s (orig. Anglo Ir.): of unknown origin …   English new terms dictionary

  • banjax — Verb. To ruin. Mainly Irish use …   English slang and colloquialisms

  • banjax — ban·jax …   English syllables

  • banjax — /ˈbændʒæks/ (say banjaks) verb (t) Chiefly Irish English Colloquial to ruin or spoil. {Dublin slang; origin unknown} …   Australian English dictionary

  • banjax —  v. Ruin. Inconvenience, bank on Rely on …   A concise dictionary of English slang

  • banjax — ˈbanˌjaks transitive verb ( ed/ ing/ es) Etymology: origin unknown chiefly Irish : damage : ruin ; also : smash …   Useful english dictionary

  • Mid Ulster English — Approximate boundaries of the English and Scots dialects spoken in Ulster. It should be noted that Ulster Scots (light blue) is not spoken in the entire shaded area – light blue indicates both current and historical Ulster Scots areas. The… …   Wikipedia

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