noun Etymology: Middle English pygyn Date: 14th century a small wooden pail with one stave extended upward as a handle

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Piggin — Pig gin, n. [Scot.; cf. Gael. pigean, dim. of pigeadh, pige, an earthen jar, pitcher, or pot, Ir. pigin, pighead, W. piccyn.] A small wooden pail or tub with an upright stave for a handle, often used as a dipper. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • piggin — [pig′in] n. [< ?] a small wooden pail with one stave extended above the rim to serve as a handle …   English World dictionary

  • piggin — noun A small pail, can or ladle with the handle on the side; a lading can. In the colonial era, some buckets were made like a small barrel, but with one stave left extra long. This stave would be carved into a handle so the bucket could be used… …   Wiktionary

  • Piggin — This unusual and interesting surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a dialectal variant of Pidgeon, which is an example of the sizeable group of early European surnames that were gradually created from the habitual use of nicknames.… …   Surnames reference

  • piggin — ˈpigə̇n noun ( s) Etymology: origin unknown 1. a. chiefly dialect : a wooden vessel shaped approximately like a pail and often having one stave extended upward for use as a handle b. : a dish shaped like a piggin, often made of glass or silver,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • piggin — /pig in/, n. 1. Dial. a small wooden pail or tub with a handle formed by continuing one of the staves above the rim. 2. See cream pail. [1545 55; perh. akin to PIG2] * * * …   Universalium

  • piggin — Cleveland Dialect List a small tub …   English dialects glossary

  • piggin — pɪgɪn n. small bucket or bowl created with staves and hoops …   English contemporary dictionary

  • piggin — pig·gin …   English syllables

  • piggin' — pig·gin …   English syllables

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